Category Archives: GAPS

Up Next on Generation Regeneration | VoiceAmerica™: Me!

Generation Regeneration | VoiceAmerica™.

“Up next on Gen R tomorrow, Tuesday, July 14, at 12pm PST or On Demand!

Hippocrates had it right: Let food be thy medicine, and medicine by thy food. The amazing Teaching Chef Monica Corrado of Simply Being Well: Cooking for Well-being will expand on this and how she has uses food to help with autoimmune disease and neurological disorders like Autism spectrum. Join us for some mid-day brain food!”

Follow the link above to tune in! or tune in HERE

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What is a Leaky Gut, anyway?!

And why should you care?
There’s a lot of talk these days about a “leaky gut”. What is it? Why should you care?

The part of the “gut” that the term refers to is the duodenum of the small intestine. The duodenum is the first part of the small intestine into which the stomach dumps its high acid mixture for further digestion and absorption. If that part of the small intestine has holes in it or is damaged, it is termed “leaky”. That’s because it leaks. Into the bloodstream…your bloodstream. The transportation system of the body, the one that carries nutrients to cells, and wastes away from cells…read on.

What leaks out of the small intestine into the blood stream? Large molecules of food that have not been broken down by that damaged area. This is highly problematic for many reasons, a few of which follow:
  1. Your food has not been digested, so your body will not get the nutrients from the food. If this goes on for a long time, you will be malnourished, and suffer the symptoms that that brings.
  2. Your food has not been digested, so large molecules will leak into the bloodstream. If they are protein molecules, the body will recognize them as “foreign proteins”, and launch an immune response. If this goes on for a long time, you will likely develop autoimmune disorders.
  3. Foreign food molecules in the bloodstream mean that you will develop food sensitivities. In the beginning, just a few sensitivities. As time goes on, your body will become highly reactive to many foods.
  4. Toxins will also leak into the bloodstream, which will go to the brain and cause focusing issues, brain fog, and inability to concentrate. If this goes on for a while, ADD, ADHD, OCD, SPD, depression, and mood swings–think bipolar– can develop. Schizophrenia has also been indicated.
Okay, so if all of that is probable with a leaky gut, why not heal it? It’s easy once you know how.
For more information about the best protocol I know to heal AND seal the gut, check out http://www.gaps.me/.
If you would like to learn how to cook to heal your gut, join me for informative, inspiring, and fun classes! I’ll be teaching in Fort Collins, Colorado on Saturday and Sunday, May 16 and 17…”Heal Your Leaky Gut: Cooking for the GAPS Diet”. Easy peasy when you know how. And that’s exactly my intention: to teach you how! More information about the cooking weekend here: http://goo.gl/BlJpQL

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Why Train to Cook for the GAPS Diet?!!

As you may or may not know, cooking for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome diet is not the same as traditional food cooking, a la WAPF or the Nourishing Traditions cookbook by Sally Fallon. In fact, may people who implement the diet from Nourishing Traditions miss many important differences between GAPS and NT. They also make mistakes in the implementation, which may delay healing and actually aggravate symptoms. Some of the symptoms can be severe, like seizures, if you are prone to them! Lesser symptoms include migraines, headaches, nervous tics, rage and outbursts, stimming, brain fog…eczema…!

The GAPS diet is a therapeutic diet…with very specific techniques that were developed to achieve therapeutic results.

One of the biggest mistakes in implementation of the Intro part of the diet is people making bone broth instead of Meat Stock. Bone broth is not part of the Intro Diet. It is not mentioned anywhere in the Intro. (And, in fact, should not be served until AFTER the small intestine, aka the “leaky gut” has been healed. Stay tuned for my new book on the subject–on the how and the why…the Ultimate Guide…!)

For years I have been on list serves for the GAPS diet, and I have read horror stories about well-meaning moms who were trying their best to implement the diet for their severely autistic children and others. The children were refusing to drink the bone broth and their mothers were trying to sneak it in wherever they could. And the children were having severe symptoms, mothers often reporting that symptoms were getting worse, not better. Much of this could have been avoided if there had been a clear understanding of how to cook for the diet.

So…….if you would like to Heal Your Leaky Gut…you must do the Intro of the Diet. All six stages. No bone broth!

I will be teaching the techniques you will need to implement the Intro THIS MAY, Saturday and Sunday, the 16 and 17, in Fort Collins, CO. I have priced the weekend very reasonably so that many can join me!  I hope you will attend!

Here’s a quick testimonial from a Certified GAPS Practitioner who took my training last year:

“I recently attended Monica Corrado’s GAPS cooking series and was blown away by how much I learned (and how much I have been doing and teaching incorrectly), even after being involved in GAPS for almost a year! Although I have been constantly learning since being introduced to the GAPS diet, my certification training did not prepare me nearly enough to guide my clients in the intricacies of food portion of this healing protocol. And as food is the primary healing means of this protocol, it is vital that we understand it well. I now feel better equipped to assist my clients and myself through this healing journey.

I also enjoyed Monica’s high-energy, down-to-earth teaching and techniques. Because of her passion and her clear, memorable explanations, I will be able to remember and pass on what I learned. This is worth just as much as the content, in my opinion. Any resources invested in learning cooking with Monica is well worth it–whether going through the diet yourself or assisting others through it. I would recommend this course to anyone!” Amy Mihaly, FNP, Certified GAPS Practitioner, Loveland, CO of Wholly Guts.

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, author of the Gut and Psychology Syndrome, is very familiar with and supportive of my work of training people to cook for the GAPS diet. This training is not currently offered in this way elsewhere. Since Food is the Foundation of the diet, knowing how to cook the food for the diet is absolutely necessary.

I invite you to attend this GAPS Cooking Weekend so that you may deeply and fully know the secrets to implementing the diet and you may implement it with the knowledge and tools you need, as well as the confidence to do so!   Cooking for the GAPS Diet, Saturday and Sunday, May 16-17, 2015…Fort Collins, CO. More information HERE. And for those of you who cannot attend, I happily guide folks through the implementation, in a Wellness Consultation. Find your time here: http://simplybeingwell.com/Consultations.html

be well, all!

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Learn to cook for the GAPS Diet! Cooking Immersion Weekend!

 

Gut and Psychology Syndrome CoverOne of the best diets to heal a leaky gut and gut dysbiosis…as well as the myriad of symptoms that result from these conditions…is the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (aka “G.A.P.S.”) diet. I have been teaching how to cook for the diet for about 5 years now, having developed one of the first sets of cooking classes for it. I have offered these classes individually over a series of weeks, and also all together over a weekend workshop as far away as California, Massachusetts, and Maryland. This coming weekend, and next month, I am inaugurating a new method which I am calling “Cooking Immersion Weekends”.

The Cooking Immersion Weekend grew out of the desire to provide a way for individuals to experience learning and cooking with all the techniques needed for the diet at one time, with other people, and with a resource right with them to answer any questions. (Me.)

I have broken up the weekends as makes the most sense: one for the “Intro” diet and another for the “Full” Diet, as cooking for them is very different. The Intro Immersion Weekend will take place this weekend, 4pm Friday through 1pm Sunday, September 2-14, 2014,  in a retreat setting at Sunrise Ranch in Loveland, CO. The Full Immersion Weekend will take place same times and place, on October 3-5, 2014.

My desire and intention for those that join me for these Cooking Immersions is that they leave feeling fully confident in their ability to implement the healing protocol when they return home. (You all know how much I love to make things easy for folks and to take the mystery out of seemingly complicated cooking techniques!)

These are very hands-on weekends; we spend a lot of time in the kitchen together. 🙂  And though those of you who have been cooking traditional food for a while will have a broader knowledge base than those who have not, cooking for the GAPS diet is very different than cooking from Nourishing Traditions. So….

You are invited to attend one or both of the weekends!

Still on the fence? Here is what Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride wrote about my cooking classes:  ” Dear Monica, I just want to thank you for your wonderful GAPS cooking classes! I am getting excellent reports from the GAPS Practitioners and patients! Everybody who attended your classes leave very inspired and ready to cook good food. Thank you!”

CGPs (Certified GAPS Practitioners) are especially welcome, as knowing how to cook for the diet is critical to its success.

You may register for the September 12-14 Cooking Immersion Weekend here.

You may register for the October 3-5 Cooking Immersion Weekend here.

 

Looking forward to cooking with you!

 

 

Please note: Gut and Psychology Syndrome is the trademark and copyright of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. The right of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Patent and Designs Act 1988.

 

 

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Meat Stock…What it is, and Why I Love it! And you will, too…

I LOVE meat stock. I love meat stock. Meat stock.

I also love bone broth. But meat stock is different than bone broth.

In the world of stock and broth…I am speaking especially to those following the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) diet…and those who are consuming a lot of stock on a daily basis…to heal their guts, to take in electrolytic minerals, to supply them with easily absorbed nutrients…somehow “meat stock” has been missed. And what a fatal flaw that is, because meat stock makes your life sooooo much easier-both for those on the GAPS diet, and for those of us other folks, who are just trying to eat well to be well.

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Meat stock is a treasure in the world of nutrient-dense foods… for those of us who are “real foodies”, Weston A. Price-ers, “traditional foodies”…and anyone who is wanting to make the most of their food dollar and their health. Most of us, that is.

The clue is in the words…”meat” stock and “bone” broth. They say a lot about the differences between the two. One is made from meat that has some bones; the other is made from bones. One is cooked for a relatively short time; the other for a very long time, sometimes up to 72 hours!

The gift of meat stock is threefold: it gives you a meal to eat and gelatinous broth to drink. Then it gives you bones you may use as boney bones for bone broth! What a deal!!

So here’s how it’s done. Please take care to use the best quality poultry or meat that you can buy. That means pastured poultry or grass-fed meat. It matters…to the Earth, the animals, and to our bodies.

Meat Stock by Monica

Obtain 2-3 pounds of meat with a bone in it. (This can be legs or thighs or quarters of a chicken or turkey or other fowl…it can be a whole or half chicken cut up. Please include the skin. Lamb shanks…beef shanks…ox tails…meaty neck bones…you get the idea.) Place the meaty bones in a 4-6 quart Dutch oven. (You may also use a crock pot if you prefer; this will lengthen the cook time. See below.)

Cover with water. Usually 1.5-2 quarts of pure, cold water

Add herbs that you love. Fresh rosemary or thyme…tied is best, so you may remove them later…and a slight handful of black or green peppercorns, whole.

Add any vegetables that you love…the usual candidates are carrots, celery and onion, but you could add other veggies if you like–mushrooms, zucchini. (Do not use potatoes or sweet potatoes or any starchy vegetables…they will cloud the stock. Stay away from broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage at this stage, they will turn the stock bitter, and you will wind up throwing it out. Boo. 😦 ) If you use carrots, celery and onion, I would use 3, 3, 1 or 3, 2, 1 or so. Onions can overpower if you add too many.

Bring to a boil over high heat.

Skim and discard any scum that surfaces. 

After you have skimmed most of the scum off of the top of the water, lower the heat to a simmer and cover the pot. (Note: do not spend a lot of time on this. You can lose some of the glorious fat if you do. Hint: wait until there is a good amount of scum on the surface, and then begin to skim. It will look like white foam, and may become quite thick depending on the quality of the bones you used.)

Cook, covered. 

If it is poultry, cook 1.5-2 hours.

If it is lamb, cook 3-4 hours

If it is beef or bison, cook 4-6 hours, or longer (8-10 most)

(If you are using a crock pot, double the hours approximately.)

Serve. 

When you serve, serve the meat and the vegetables and a cup of stock on the side to drink. (Remember to add good quality Celtic sea salt and pastured butter or ghee. The salt will give you trace minerals your body needs, and the healthy fat will help your body to absorb the vitamins from the food.)

Mmmmmmmmmmmmm so good and healing and warming on these cold, snowy Winter days.

And if you are interested in learning more, check out my book on Meat Stock and Bone Broth! 

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Gelatinous meat stock

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Save the bones for your next round of bone broth. If you don’t have enough to start a batch right away, (approx. 4 pound of chicken bones or 7 pounds of beef or bison bones), you may wish to store them in a freezer bag once they’ve cooled. For more information about making bone broth from those leftover bones, check out my article, Healing Soups series: Let’s Step Back to Stock https://simplybeingwell.wordpress.com/2012/01/27/healing-soups-series-lets-step-back-to-stock/

Enjoy!!

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Allergies? Heal and seal your gut!

So many people with so many allergies. Allergies, sensitivities and intolerances…to foods, to ingredients, to dust, to plants, trees and pollen, to environmental toxins. How about you?

So many times moms have come to work with me in my private practice for help crafting a food plan for their child, having just received their food allergy/sensitivity test results for their child. They have come exasperated, feeling desperate. The previous test may have revealed 5 or 6 “trigger foods”…now the number was 30. What were they going to feed their child? How could we craft a diet or menu that was appealing with all of these restrictions? How could we craft a menu that they would eat? Overwhelming! I have even had some clients with more than 120 foods that had been identified as no good. Funny, every time they went for the next test, the number of trigger foods, or those that were not allowed from that point on, increased.

Why?

It is not that the foods themselves are inherently evil or bad. I have often said that gluten is the current “fall guy”. This week you react to wheat, next week it’s gluten. The next week, gluten and casein…The next week it’s gluten, casein, and eggs. The next week it’s gluten, casein, eggs, chicken, and green beans. Or carrots. Or coconut. Or herring. And so on. And so on. And so on, until you or your child seem to be reacting to just about everything. What is going on?

The body, specifically the small intestine, is injured…porous…leaky…and all of the molecules become reactive foods.

All allergies can be traced to the state of health of the gut lining.

When your small intestine lining has holes in it, not only are food molecules not broken down or digested as they need to be in order for the body to utilize them, but they also pass through the holes and into the bloodstream as foreign molecules. Foreign molecules in the blood mean that the body is going to respond with an allergic reaction or sensitivity or intolerance to the food at the least. If this goes on for years, autoimmune disorders may result…

So…what to do?

Surgery isn’t going to do it, folks. Nor are pharmaceuticals. The problem is in the gut…so the medicine is food. And while no diet can claim to do everything for all people, I have found one that does a lot to heal and seal the gut. It is the GAPS diet… the Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. (For more information about the GAPS Diet, see www.gaps.me.)

Are you, too, gluten-free? casein-free? wheat-free? dairy-free? Have multiple allergies or sensitivities? Are you tired of it? Check out the GAPS diet.

I will be teaching about how to heal and seal the gut this Saturday, June 8 in Fort Collins, CO. The class is Implementing the Intro Diet.  (aka, HEAL IT AND SEAL IT!)

I will be teaching a GAPS Cooking Weekend in Silver Spring, MD August 9-10. All the cooking techniques you need to implement the diet with confidence.  Dr. Joseph Mercola called these cooking classes “ground-breaking.” More information about that weekend here.

The bottom line, folks…heal it and seal it. It all begins with the food.

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Yummy Basic Cake recipe…GF, grain -free, can be CF, GAPS

This is a yummy cake recipe that is easily adaptable…a “foundation” or a “basic” that anyone can learn and use. AND it is good for you. Gluten-free, grain-free, casein-free if you want it to be, and GAPS. So it’s a WIN WIN WIN for all…good for you and yummy too!

Okay, here goes. This recipe will yield one 9″ round, one bread loaf, or one dozen muffins.

2.5 cups almond flour

1/4-1/3 cup pastured butter, ghee, whey, plain organic yogurt or creme fraiche (your own 24 hour culture for GAPS), or coconut oil, duck fat, goose fat, OR lard if you want to be casein-free

4 eggs

2 tsp vanilla extract

NOTE:  It is best for your digestion if you soak the almond flour for 24 hours in the whey, yogurt or creme fraiche. It will also give you a fluffier (yes, fluffy almond flour) cake. Simply mix the almond flour and the whey, yogurt or creme fraiche in a medium bowl, cover and leave out on the counter for 24 hours. (Out of the sun, covered with a towel or such.)

Whisk the eggs in a small bowl, then pour into the soaked almond flour and mix thoroughly. (If you choose not to soak the flour, simply combine the almond flour with the ingredient of your choice (butter, lard, goose or duck fat, yogurt, creme fraiche, etc. If you use butter or ghee, melt it first before you mix) and then pour the whisked eggs into the mixture and combine thoroughly.

Pour batter into a prepared 9 inch round pan. (Prepare by greasing well with a fat you love or by lining it with parchment paper cut to fit.) Smooth with a spatula.

Place in a preheated 350 F oven and bake for about one hour. (This will depend on your altitude.) I would start checking for doneness at 45 minutes. You will know it is done when a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

Options: add 1/2-1 cup of berries, raisins, currants, fruit-sweetened cranberries or blueberries or minced dried fruit right into the batter;  grate in the zest of 2 organic lemons or oranges…add carob chips

Another option: To make a delightfully sweet treat,  add in 2 cups baked, mashed butternut squash. I prefer to make these into muffins than a cake, because the squash makes it more moist and thus will take much longer to bake as a cake. Muffins are easier to monitor–that is to ensure they bake through and don’t burn. I would bake them as muffins for about 50 minutes at the same temperature, checking early. The addition of the butternut squash makes a delightfully sweet muffin.

As always, I encourage you to experiment, mix it up, use spices you love, and have fun!

Enjoy!

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