Category Archives: simply being well

Beans at High Altitudes!

beans-in-colander

A long time ago…more than six years now, I published a chart that summarized how to soak beans…which “neutralizers” for which beans, how long to soak them, at what temperature water, and how to cook them. I gleaned the information from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. When I asked Sally to review my chart for accuracy, she said that I had missed the baking soda. “Baking soda”?! There was no mention of baking soda in her chapters on beans! Yikes! Sally provided me with a report to read through on how to make beans more easily digested  that had been published in Wise Traditions, the journal of the Weston A. Price Foundation. In order to make my soaking chart accurate, I needed to include baking soda as one of the neutralizers for specific types of beans. So I updated the chart, got her “thumbs up”, and had it printed. My chart is called “Preparing Whole Grains and Legumes for Ease of Digestion and  Nutrient Availability“. It has been available on my website since 2010. It is hand-illustrated and hand-lettered, and it has well served many people around the world since then.

As some of you know, I moved to Colorado in 2011. I now live at almost 5,000 feet, after living at sea level for all of my life until then. Living at high altitude demands some changes in the kitchen. One of those changes has been in cooking beans. Now, while we are not big bean eaters in my house, I do soak beans for chili, and lentils for soup, etc. I have found the easiest way to make the perfect beans at high altitude. I shared that information in my latest post on Selene River Press, in “Perfect Beans at 5,000 Feet“. You can find that article here. I hope you enjoy it!

 

Order your own Bean and Grain Chart!

Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon Morell

 

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Filed under Food, simply being well, soaking beans, traditional foods

Bone Broth does not heal a leaky gut!

Beef broth and vegetables

Nope. It does not–at least, according to the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) Diet. In fact, bone broth is not even mentioned in the diet! Can you believe it?  A little background here.

I came across the book Gut and Psychology Syndrome in 2007, in my search for healing diets specifically for children with autism spectrum and ADD or ADHD. I had read many others, parts of which included many things that I could see would work. But somehow, they never felt complete to me. That same year, nearly a decade ago, I was blessed to meet Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, author of the book and creator of the healing protocol for which the book is named at the 2007 annual conference of the Weston A. Price Foundation in Chantilly, Virginia. I remember that I drove out from my home in Silver Spring, Maryland specifically to hear Dr. Natasha’s talk on the Gut and Psychology Syndrome. That day, she talked for a mere hour and fifteen minutes, one of many other “track” speakers. (At nearly every conference since then, Dr. Natasha has presented an entire day on GAPS. This was the introduction of her work to “WAPers” and others who sought alternative healing based on traditional foods.)  As I sat and listened to her talk, tears welled up and I cried. I cried the tears of knowing that I had finally found someone with answers to why people were so sick. Why the children were so sick, and what could be done about it. The program she explained felt complete. It had the missing pieces. And it started with THE FOOD.

For those of you who know me, you know that I believe and have built my life’s work on the understanding that “food is the foundation”. Good food. Real food. Food that is raised in a sustainable way. Food that nourishes the land as it is grown, and the people that eat it. Food that is cooked in a way that preserves and maximizes nutrient value and digestibility. Food provides the building blocks, macro and micro-nutrients that the human body needs to thrive. It has come to be known as “nourishing, traditional food”, based on the principles of Dr. Weston A. Price, and the cookbook that Sally Fallon (Morell) published in 1998, Nourishing Traditions. To hear that day a medical doctor talk about how AUTISM could be healed through FOOD…how it worked and why it worked, was at the same time mind-blowing to me, and obviously simple. Of course it could. Of course it would. So, after that day, I set myself the task of learning the diet, inside and out, the nuances, the cooking techniques so that I could share them with anyone who would listen…and I do that to this day.

I developed cooking classes specific to the GAPS diet in 2010. When I was introduced to Dr. Joseph Mercola in 2011 by Dr. Natasha and her husband at the Wise Traditions Conference in Dallas, and they told him I had developed cooking classes for the GAPS diet, he used the term “ground breaking”. Yes, they were–and yes, they are, for I am still working to teach those techniques that are specific to GAPS, to clear up misunderstandings about cooking for the diet and how it works. I write, I blog, I speak, I teach. Wherever and whenever I can. When I realized the misunderstanding about bone broth that was going around the forums and list serves at that time–that moms all over the country were trying to implement the diet with bone broth–long cooked bone broth, full of glutamic acid (read “MSG”), which could trigger neurological symptoms in those that had them (read “autistic children”) had to be corrected. There is no bone broth in GAPS, folks. The stock that Dr. Natasha writes about is clearly Meat Stock. Short cooked stock, made from meaty bones with joints and connective tissue. Yes, you can throw in marrow bones for their added goodness, but they are not the main ingredients.

In order to get the word out and clear up the confusion between bone broth and meat stock, I started writing a series of books called Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet. Eventually, there will be four parts to the series, explaining the very important nuances of cooking for this healing protocol. This is not the “well” diet, folks. It is a therapeutic diet, that is designed to produced therapeutic results. Part I of my series of books (available as ebooks to get the word out, pdfs and print editions), the most important part, is called “Meat Stock and Bone Broth“. My publisher, Selene River Press (a fabulous publisher that carries select books on nutrition and health based on the works of Dr. Royal Lee) puts it like this: “Bringing new clarity to the GAPS diet in non-clinical language all readers can understand, expert chef, author, and teacher Monica Corrado shores up a critical but often misunderstood aspect of the GAPS healing protocol—meat stock and bone broth. When you make them. How you make them. Why you make them. And, crucially, why you shouldn’t mix them up.”

I invite you to take a read of my book on Meat Stock and Bone Broth. I also invite you to experience the most healing part of the GAPS diet, the “Intro” with me during what I am calling “Jump Start: GAPS”, an online program I am offering February 20 – 27. An easy, inexpensive way to access me, a Certified GAPS Practitioner and a Teaching Chef, and have your questions answered. More info about Jump Start: GAPS here.

 

More about the GAPS Diet

More about Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride

Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet Part I: Meat Stock and Bone Broth

Part II: Culturing Dairy

Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon Morell

Weston A. Price Foundation

Dr. Royal Lee

 

Note: Some of the above are affiliate links. Thank you for supporting my writing.

 

 

 

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Filed under children's health, Food, GAPS, meat stock, simply being well

Tools to Soothe and Stabilize!

Some of you may not know that my company, Simply Being Well, celebrated its 10 year anniversary last year. Ten years!

Simply Being Well began with the tagline: Herbs, Oils, Essences, and Whole Foods. I started with a desire to share my knowledge of alternative healing modalities with everyone–especially moms and those who wanted to be moms someday. I offered classes and workshops, and had a private practice. Simply Being Well evolved to focus on teaching cooking classes and training Traditional Food Cooks and Teachers based on Weston A. Price and the cookbook, Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig. That’s where Cooking for Well-Being came from.

I taught my first cooking class on a six foot table at a local food co-op in Bethesda, Maryland, in September of 2006, after being asked to “teach Nourishing Traditions”. Who knew that first class would be the catalyst for 10 years of teaching cooking?! I loved it. I still do! And I believe, in my heart of hearts, that “food is the foundationTM” of well-being. That’s why I continue to teach Cooking for Well-Being, and help people to source clean, sustainable food, and guide people through their healing journeys with food–nourishing, traditional food and, specifically, the Gut and Psychology Syndrome–GAPS–Diet, since 2010.

All along, however, I have continued to work with clients, offering various vibrational remedies to support them on their way. That is still very much a part of Simply Being Well and my Wellness Consultations. Flower essences, therapeutic grade essential oils and other alternative modalities can be very powerful assistants on one’s way to heath. (For more information about the Vibrational Cause of Chronic Disease, see my article here). So, while “food is the foundation” of Well-Being, it’s not the only thing. Remedies from the plant kingdom can surely help ease the way, and I test for specific remedies to clear the cause of specific symptoms for clients.

In times of chronic stress, trial, or turbulence, we need all the tools we can get to help us maintain alignment and stability. It is this knowing that has led me to offer a series of videos on “Tools to Soothe and Stabilize”. There are very simple things we can do to help ourselves, our families, our children, our pets to weather storms with more ease. It is my hope that these short clips will help you on your way.

You may find them on my YouTube channel (subscribe!), and on my Simply Being Well: Cooking for Wellbeing Facebook Page.

Here’s the link to the first Tools to Soothe and Stabilize I hope it serves you well!

 

For Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig,

For the Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Natasha Campbell-McBride

Please note these are affiliate links.

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Filed under Health and Wellness, simply being well