Category Archives: traditional foods

Beans at High Altitudes!

beans-in-colander

A long time ago…more than six years now, I published a chart that summarized how to soak beans…which “neutralizers” for which beans, how long to soak them, at what temperature water, and how to cook them. I gleaned the information from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. When I asked Sally to review my chart for accuracy, she said that I had missed the baking soda. “Baking soda”?! There was no mention of baking soda in her chapters on beans! Yikes! Sally provided me with a report to read through on how to make beans more easily digested  that had been published in Wise Traditions, the journal of the Weston A. Price Foundation. In order to make my soaking chart accurate, I needed to include baking soda as one of the neutralizers for specific types of beans. So I updated the chart, got her “thumbs up”, and had it printed. My chart is called “Preparing Whole Grains and Legumes for Ease of Digestion and  Nutrient Availability“. It has been available on my website since 2010. It is hand-illustrated and hand-lettered, and it has well served many people around the world since then.

As some of you know, I moved to Colorado in 2011. I now live at almost 5,000 feet, after living at sea level for all of my life until then. Living at high altitude demands some changes in the kitchen. One of those changes has been in cooking beans. Now, while we are not big bean eaters in my house, I do soak beans for chili, and lentils for soup, etc. I have found the easiest way to make the perfect beans at high altitude. I shared that information in my latest post on Selene River Press, in “Perfect Beans at 5,000 Feet“. You can find that article here. I hope you enjoy it!

 

Order your own Bean and Grain Chart!

Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon Morell

 

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Filed under Food, simply being well, soaking beans, traditional foods

What’s up with Bread in the US of A?

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This is a beautiful, homemade, sprouted spelt sourdough bread, made for me by Min Kim.This is NOT typical American bread these days. However, it is an example of the true bread we are meant to eat. Read why in my article! 

Ever wonder why you can eat bread, rolls, bakeries, and pasta with ease when you travel to Europe or almost any other country in the world? Interested in some ideas? Check out my latest article, “Gluten-Free in America” on Selene River Press HERE.

 

If you would like to learn how to make your own delicious, nutritious, traditional sourdough bread with ease, check out Min’s ebook HERE

 

 

Min is a graduate of my Cooking for Well-Being Teacher Training program. She taught herself how to make sourdough bread after healing herself and her family with the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) Diet. Min makes sourdough in SoCAL and teaches classes. If you would like to heal your gut and be able to eat bread again, schedule a Wellness Consultation.

 

 

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Holiday Bloat? Something you can do right now!

If you are like most people. you may be feeling a bit bloated or heavy around the middle right now. A few days –or weeks, in some cases–of holiday festivities are taking their toll… on your energy level, your brain function, your digestion and your waistline.

We still have a week to go until the ball drops on Time Square to ring in 2017, and there may be more gatherings and parties ahead of you before you make that New Year’s Resolution. I mean, why start now, right?

There is a very simple thing that you can do right now that will help. It’s easy, it’s inexpensive, it tastes good, and it is high impact on your liver…which will help ease that bloat. You’ll feel better soon, and you will be better able to handle the upcoming indulgences.

What is it? The humble lemon. Yep.

lemon-cut

Every morning, cut a lemon in half and squeeze the juice into a glass of warm water. Add a pinch of turmeric or cayenne, if you would like to go turbo. Be sure the lemon is organic, so that you can avoid adding more toxins to your diet, those toxins we are trying to get rid of… ! If you drink tea, herbal, green, or black, try adding a bit of lemon to each cup or mug. Throughout the day, squeeze a bit of lemon into your water glass. Room temperature or warm water works best, because “cold contracts and warm releases”.

If you’d like a little boost to your immune system, eat a bit of lemon rind-chock full of citrus bioflavanoids, Vitamin C, and potassium!

 

For those of you who would like to start the New Year with a gentle cleanse and re-balancing, join me for my one week, online program, Resolution: Re-Set! January 9-16, 2017. Anyone can join me from around the globe. You can find more information here: https://goo.gl/fNA2hY The price goes up on December 28, so register now to receive your Resolution: Re-Set info and package!

Happy cleansing!

🙂

 

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Candida? Thrush? Eczema? Kefir!

Read my article on Selene River Press: Candida, Thrush, or Eczema got you Down? Try Kefir! 

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B-e-a-utiful Kefir Grains…photo by Sandrine Love

Want to know more? Find recipes for making kefir with grains, a starter packet, or from a previous batch of kefir in my latest book, Culturing Dairy (Part II of the series on Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet (GAPS) )

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Looks like sour cream, tastes like sour cream…?

For more information about sour cream in America, and recipes to make your own with ease…check out my latest article on Selene River Press

Fresh, raw cream

Fresh, raw cream…the source of sour(ed) cream

Photo by Sandrine Love

 

 

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Lactose-free? This Yogurt’s for You!

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Beautiful, silky, and lactose-free raw yogurt!

I am blessed to be living in a cow-share state, Colorado…a cow-share state is one where individuals can access delicious, nutritious, clean, fresh raw milk. I am also blessed to be a part of a cow-share at a biodynamic dairy farm in Boulder, Light Root Community Farm.

 

I was invited to teach a class on how to Culture Dairy at the farm last week. I taught those who attended the traditional techniques of making yogurt, creme fraiche, and kefir with raw milk and raw cream. I also went over the benefits of raw versus pasteurized milk and cream.

 

Culturing milk and cream is a very easy thing to do once you know how to do it…and there are a myriad of benefits to doing so. Even organic liquid milk can be hard for the body to digest because of the presence of lactose, a milk sugar, and casein, a milk protein. Culturing milk or cream will predigest the lactose and the casein for you, which will make yogurt, creme fraiche, and kefir easy on your digestive system.

 

Cultured dairy products are a large part of the GAPS (Gut and Psychology SyndromeTM) diet…because they are easy on the digestive system and contribute beneficial bacteria to the digestive tract, as well as live enzymes and soothing lactic acid. Many people who have dairy “sensitivities” and allergies, or “lactose intolerance” stay away from dairy because they think that they cannot tolerate them. But they need not do so.  All cultured dairy…all yogurt, all creme fraiche, all kefir…was meant to be free of lactose…and you can make your own at home, with ease.

 

The quality of being free of lactose is achieved by doing what I call “culturing long”. The vast majority of yogurt or other cultured dairy products that are commercially available are not cultured for a length of time required to ensure that the lactose is pre-digested by the lactic acid producing bacteria, or lacto-bacilli. I learned this when I started teaching others about the GAPS diet, and the Dairy Introduction Protocol of the GAPS diet, i.e., when I was looking for a “therapeutic grade” yogurt for my clients and students. Easy peasy. Just allow your milk or cream to culture at 110 degrees F for a minimum of 24 hours. (I like to suggest that folks allow the culturing to go on for 36 hours or so.) Once you do this, viola’! Lactose-free cultured dairy products! Yes, you, too, can eat yogurt (or creme fraiche, or kefir) again!

 

Here’s a quick recipe for  RAW yogurt. Note that if you choose to use pasteurized milk, you MUST heat it first to 180 degrees F and then cool it to 110 degrees F prior to culturing, in order to kill off anything that may be growing in the milk that was sterilized (pasteurized). Also, be sure to use the highest quality pasteurized milk available: organic, whole, non-homogenized, no fillers, from pastured cows if possible, never UHT.

 

Yogurt

1 quart raw milk

1/3 cup or more yogurt, whey or starter

  • Pour milk into a heavy sauce pot. Slowly heat milk to 110 degrees F on the stove. (A digital thermometer makes it easy to track the temperature.) When it reaches the desired temperature, pour the milk quickly into a thermos and hold for 24 hours-36 hours. (Here is a thermos which will do so, and a canning funnel that will help you pour it with ease.) Alternatively, you may also use an electric plate, dehydrator, or a gas stove with pilot light on only.
  • If you have a yogurt maker, stir and place in yogurt maker for 24 hours. Then place in glass jar and refrigerate.

 

Learn more about the benefits of cultured dairy and more culturing techniques in my latest book! It is available as an ebook, a pdf, and a print edition: Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet, Part II: Culturing Dairy.

 

More about biodynamic farming and biodynamic dairy farming

More about Light Root Community Farm

More about Raw Milk

More about the GAPS Diet and how diet can heal your leaky gut and the symptoms that come with it

 

 

Until next time, enjoy!

 

 

 

Please note that the above links to products are affiliate links.

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Filed under ferments, Food, GAPS, raw milk, Recipes, traditional foods