Tag Archives: Autism

Edema? Eczema? A-fib? The One Pot Meal that Heals™

This is a story based on personal experience. It is not peer reviewed and has no footnotes for you. It is not academic (though I have plenty of stories of clients and students that have healed through food…). This is just a story of how a tremendously healing meal…one that is SO easy to make…so deeply nourishing…worked its magic in my own home. On symptoms we had NO IDEA it would clear.

The Gut and Psychology Syndrome™, aka, “GAPS” diet, is known mostly for its ability to heal symptoms of brain function that are connected to the relative health or damage of the gut. ADD, ADHD, Autism Spectrum, brain fog, dyslexia, dyspraxia, schizophrenia to name a few. I teach how to cook for the GAPS diet, and most of the people who attend or wish to work with me have those symptoms. I am used to the idea of eating to heal the gut, and subsequently, brain function. Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, author of the GAPS diet, has been saying for years (and I believe her) that all physical symptoms can be traced to the gut, a leaky gut, that is. She is currently writing the “Gut and Physiology Syndrome”…which says just that. But now, I got to see and experience first-hand, how the GAPS diet heals so many other things.

High blood sugar? Check.

High blood pressure? Check.

Atrial fibrillation? Check.

Arrhythmia? Check.

Severe Edema? Check.

Weight loss? Check.

Yep. All of the above symptoms back into normal range…or no longer symptoms, within just two months. These were chronic, entrenched symptoms, present for decades. And I didn’t even TRY to heal them.  No special diet, no “intake” done. It was merely the result of eating the way we eat in my home…organic whenever possible, no processed foods, no soda or soft drinks. And one other thing. We eat Meat Stock two or three times a week in my home. Yep. That’s it. Meat Stock.

 

meat stock photo

What IS “Meat Stock”? Meat Stock is what I call the “One Pot Meal that Heals™”… because that’s what it does. It heals. Meat Stock is the foundation of the GAPS diet, it is the food that provides the nutrients that heal a leaky gut…and then the symptoms of that leaky gut. Meat Stock is NOT just broth. It is NOT bone broth. It is faster to make, and more nutrient-dense than bone broth. Meat Stock is an entire MEAL…you eat the meat, you drink the stock that is made from the meat, and you eat the vegetables, (with liberal amounts of healthy traditional fats, like pastured butter, tallow, duck fat…and good, high mineral sea salt.) Meat Stock is made with any meat with a joint and connective tissue–chicken, turkey, duck, quail, beef, bison, lamb, pork, fish…It’s a one pot meal. Did I mention that it heals?

So what can Meat Stock heal?

Leaky gut and the symptoms that stem from it…everything mentioned above, including:

  • brain function  and nervous system disorders: ADD, ADHD, Autism Spectrum, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, SPD, OCD, depression, dyslexia, dyspraxia, brain fog…
  • digestive system disorders: IBS, Colitis, food allergies, constipation, diarrhea, bloating, SIBO, high blood sugar–hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia
  • skin disorders, most notably eczema…
  • autoimmune disorders (of which there are between 80-100 or more, depending on who you ask)
  • heart function disorders: arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation…
  • edema
  • asthma

If it could be as easy as changing your diet and eating a One Pot Meal that Heals™…aka, Meat Stock, wouldn’t you be interested? Even if it didn’t clear everything within two months, wouldn’t it be worth it? Imagine if you worked with someone to implement the GAPS diet over a period of six months –  two years, how much could be healed?!

For more information, including recipes…I wrote a book, Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet, Part I: Meat Stock and Bone Broth 

For more information about leaky gut-what it is and why you should heal it, see “What is a Leaky Gut, Anyway?

If you would like some guidance as you cook to heal your leaky gut and the symptoms that come from it, contact me.

Celtic Sea Salt

Gut and Psychology Syndrome

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Bone Broth does not heal a leaky gut!

Beef broth and vegetables

Nope. It does not–at least, according to the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) Diet. In fact, bone broth is not even mentioned in the diet! Can you believe it?  A little background here.

I came across the book Gut and Psychology Syndrome in 2007, in my search for healing diets specifically for children with autism spectrum and ADD or ADHD. I had read many others, parts of which included many things that I could see would work. But somehow, they never felt complete to me. That same year, nearly a decade ago, I was blessed to meet Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, author of the book and creator of the healing protocol for which the book is named at the 2007 annual conference of the Weston A. Price Foundation in Chantilly, Virginia. I remember that I drove out from my home in Silver Spring, Maryland specifically to hear Dr. Natasha’s talk on the Gut and Psychology Syndrome. That day, she talked for a mere hour and fifteen minutes, one of many other “track” speakers. (At nearly every conference since then, Dr. Natasha has presented an entire day on GAPS. This was the introduction of her work to “WAPers” and others who sought alternative healing based on traditional foods.)  As I sat and listened to her talk, tears welled up and I cried. I cried the tears of knowing that I had finally found someone with answers to why people were so sick. Why the children were so sick, and what could be done about it. The program she explained felt complete. It had the missing pieces. And it started with THE FOOD.

For those of you who know me, you know that I believe and have built my life’s work on the understanding that “food is the foundation”. Good food. Real food. Food that is raised in a sustainable way. Food that nourishes the land as it is grown, and the people that eat it. Food that is cooked in a way that preserves and maximizes nutrient value and digestibility. Food provides the building blocks, macro and micro-nutrients that the human body needs to thrive. It has come to be known as “nourishing, traditional food”, based on the principles of Dr. Weston A. Price, and the cookbook that Sally Fallon (Morell) published in 1998, Nourishing Traditions. To hear that day a medical doctor talk about how AUTISM could be healed through FOOD…how it worked and why it worked, was at the same time mind-blowing to me, and obviously simple. Of course it could. Of course it would. So, after that day, I set myself the task of learning the diet, inside and out, the nuances, the cooking techniques so that I could share them with anyone who would listen…and I do that to this day.

I developed cooking classes specific to the GAPS diet in 2010. When I was introduced to Dr. Joseph Mercola in 2011 by Dr. Natasha and her husband at the Wise Traditions Conference in Dallas, and they told him I had developed cooking classes for the GAPS diet, he used the term “ground breaking”. Yes, they were–and yes, they are, for I am still working to teach those techniques that are specific to GAPS, to clear up misunderstandings about cooking for the diet and how it works. I write, I blog, I speak, I teach. Wherever and whenever I can. When I realized the misunderstanding about bone broth that was going around the forums and list serves at that time–that moms all over the country were trying to implement the diet with bone broth–long cooked bone broth, full of glutamic acid (read “MSG”), which could trigger neurological symptoms in those that had them (read “autistic children”) had to be corrected. There is no bone broth in GAPS, folks. The stock that Dr. Natasha writes about is clearly Meat Stock. Short cooked stock, made from meaty bones with joints and connective tissue. Yes, you can throw in marrow bones for their added goodness, but they are not the main ingredients.

In order to get the word out and clear up the confusion between bone broth and meat stock, I started writing a series of books called Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet. Eventually, there will be four parts to the series, explaining the very important nuances of cooking for this healing protocol. This is not the “well” diet, folks. It is a therapeutic diet, that is designed to produced therapeutic results. Part I of my series of books (available as ebooks to get the word out, pdfs and print editions), the most important part, is called “Meat Stock and Bone Broth“. My publisher, Selene River Press (a fabulous publisher that carries select books on nutrition and health based on the works of Dr. Royal Lee) puts it like this: “Bringing new clarity to the GAPS diet in non-clinical language all readers can understand, expert chef, author, and teacher Monica Corrado shores up a critical but often misunderstood aspect of the GAPS healing protocol—meat stock and bone broth. When you make them. How you make them. Why you make them. And, crucially, why you shouldn’t mix them up.”

I invite you to take a read of my book on Meat Stock and Bone Broth. I also invite you to experience the most healing part of the GAPS diet, the “Intro” with me during what I am calling “Jump Start: GAPS”, an online program I am offering February 20 – 27. An easy, inexpensive way to access me, a Certified GAPS Practitioner and a Teaching Chef, and have your questions answered. More info about Jump Start: GAPS here.

 

More about the GAPS Diet

More about Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride

Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet Part I: Meat Stock and Bone Broth

Part II: Culturing Dairy

Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon Morell

Weston A. Price Foundation

Dr. Royal Lee

 

Note: Some of the above are affiliate links. Thank you for supporting my writing.

 

 

 

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Up Next on Generation Regeneration | VoiceAmerica™: Me!

Generation Regeneration | VoiceAmerica™.

“Up next on Gen R tomorrow, Tuesday, July 14, at 12pm PST or On Demand!

Hippocrates had it right: Let food be thy medicine, and medicine by thy food. The amazing Teaching Chef Monica Corrado of Simply Being Well: Cooking for Well-being will expand on this and how she has uses food to help with autoimmune disease and neurological disorders like Autism spectrum. Join us for some mid-day brain food!”

Follow the link above to tune in! or tune in HERE

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Woot! Secrets to Cooking for the GAPS diet revealed…!

Pot-v3

I LOVE my work!

I LOVE to teach!

I am so looking forward to sharing my weekend with those who would like to learn the secrets to cooking for the protocol that heals and seals leaky guts. And guess what? almost everyone has one!

Who would benefit from cooking this way?

Everyone, especially those that are between the ages of 0 and 65…especially:

  • Anyone who has been vaccinated
  • Anyone who has taken even one round of antibiotics or had them administered
  • Anyone who has traveled abroad
  • Anyone who has had allergies, including seasonal allergies and food allergies
  • Anyone who has had skin disorders, eczema, rashes, etc
  • Anyone on the Autistic Spectrum, with Aspergers, ADD, ADHD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression, schizophrenia
  • Anyone with an auto-immune disorder

This weekend, I’ll teach the secrets to the following techniques. The HOW and the WHY. We’ll be making:

  • Bone Broth
  • Coconut Milk
  • Coconut Flour
  • Nut Milk
  • Nut Butters
  • Nut Flour
  • Fermented Beans
  • Culturing Dairy
  • Fermented Nut Flour
  • Baking with Nut Flour

We’ll be cooking at the top of a mountain in Loveland, Colorado…Friday through Sunday. You may find more information here: http://www.cookingforwell-being.com/October-3-2014.html

Or you can stay tuned for my next book on the subject. In process now. 🙂

 

Check out also: Nourishing Broth, the newest book by Sally Fallon Morell and Kaayla Daniels, and The Heal Your Gut Cookbook by Hilary Boynton and Mary Brackett, for which I consulted!

 

Please note this page contains affiliate links.

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Allergies? Heal and seal your gut!

So many people with so many allergies. Allergies, sensitivities and intolerances…to foods, to ingredients, to dust, to plants, trees and pollen, to environmental toxins. How about you?

So many times moms have come to work with me in my private practice for help crafting a food plan for their child, having just received their food allergy/sensitivity test results for their child. They have come exasperated, feeling desperate. The previous test may have revealed 5 or 6 “trigger foods”…now the number was 30. What were they going to feed their child? How could we craft a diet or menu that was appealing with all of these restrictions? How could we craft a menu that they would eat? Overwhelming! I have even had some clients with more than 120 foods that had been identified as no good. Funny, every time they went for the next test, the number of trigger foods, or those that were not allowed from that point on, increased.

Why?

It is not that the foods themselves are inherently evil or bad. I have often said that gluten is the current “fall guy”. This week you react to wheat, next week it’s gluten. The next week, gluten and casein…The next week it’s gluten, casein, and eggs. The next week it’s gluten, casein, eggs, chicken, and green beans. Or carrots. Or coconut. Or herring. And so on. And so on. And so on, until you or your child seem to be reacting to just about everything. What is going on?

The body, specifically the small intestine, is injured…porous…leaky…and all of the molecules become reactive foods.

All allergies can be traced to the state of health of the gut lining.

When your small intestine lining has holes in it, not only are food molecules not broken down or digested as they need to be in order for the body to utilize them, but they also pass through the holes and into the bloodstream as foreign molecules. Foreign molecules in the blood mean that the body is going to respond with an allergic reaction or sensitivity or intolerance to the food at the least. If this goes on for years, autoimmune disorders may result…

So…what to do?

Surgery isn’t going to do it, folks. Nor are pharmaceuticals. The problem is in the gut…so the medicine is food. And while no diet can claim to do everything for all people, I have found one that does a lot to heal and seal the gut. It is the GAPS diet… the Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. (For more information about the GAPS Diet, see www.gaps.me.)

Are you, too, gluten-free? casein-free? wheat-free? dairy-free? Have multiple allergies or sensitivities? Are you tired of it? Check out the GAPS diet.

I will be teaching about how to heal and seal the gut this Saturday, June 8 in Fort Collins, CO. The class is Implementing the Intro Diet.  (aka, HEAL IT AND SEAL IT!)

I will be teaching a GAPS Cooking Weekend in Silver Spring, MD August 9-10. All the cooking techniques you need to implement the diet with confidence.  Dr. Joseph Mercola called these cooking classes “ground-breaking.” More information about that weekend here.

The bottom line, folks…heal it and seal it. It all begins with the food.

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Ferments: A Cornerstone of GAPS(TM)

Seems that everyone I talk to that is “doing the GAPS diet” is not actually doing the GAPS diet. FERMENTS are a cornerstone of the GAPS diet, so why aren’t folks eating them and using them as they need to?

I’ve got a couple of ideas: 1. They don’t know how to make them, 2. They don’t know where to buy them, or 3. They just don’t realize how important they are to the success of the diet.

Ferments are oh so easy to make. I LOVE ferments. I love teaching ferments. I think ferments may be THE MOST IMPORTANT part of a healthy diet today. That’s why I run around giving people fermented condiments and teaching fermentation to almost anyone who asks. If you don’t know how to make them, pick up a book (GAPS, Nourishing Traditions, Wild Fermentation or my book, with Love from Grandmother’s Kitchen: Traditional Cooking Techniques for Well-Being). Learn to make fermented ketchup, mustard and mayo! (how easy is that?) or come to a class! I will be teaching one on Saturday, February 25, inWestminster, CO.

If you don’t want to learn, there are more than a few good ferments out there that you may purchase. Food co-ops tend to be full of them, and here inColorado, lots of folks make them and then swap them at food swaps. MOMs (My Organic Market) or the Takoma Park Coop in the DC area are chock full of them. You may also order them online. Some brands are Deep Root or Bubbies. So I hear you say, “I can’t find those brands; we don’t have those brands. How do I know a “good ferment” when I see one?” And I say, first, a ferment that is live will be found in the refrigerated section of the store. (That rule doesn’t help when you are shopping on the internet, I know.) So use rule number 2: look at the ingredient list. A true ferment will have “the thing” that is being fermented, for example, cucumbers, water, spices and salt. That is all. No vinegar. Just salt. (Most ferments available in stores do not have whey as an ingredient.)

Now that we have cleared up how to learn to make the ferments, or how/where to find them, let’s move on to THE IMPORTANCE OF FERMENTS to the GAPS Diet. They are CRITICAL to the success of the diet. So don’t skip them, folks, and don’t just “kinda” do them. What I call “food ferments” and “bug juice” can be far more powerful than probiotics you take in a pill, for several reasons, not the least of which is that they areFOOD. That means your body will easily use them. They are also truly alive. I continue to be wary of probiotic pills, because although they “guarantee” a certain number of “live cells” per serving as of processing date, they are dying all the time…and how fast? How many are left per serving when you are at the bottom of the bottle? And what was the “process” they used to culture the bacteria, harvest the bacteria, or encapsulate the bacteria? I know you know I always encourage you to get back into the kitchen and make your own…everything…whenever you can.

So ferments, ferments. Good for the gut; crucial to the immune system; help clear brain fog…cheap and easy to make. Ferments give a “big” nutritional and immune system “bang for your buck” folks. No refrigerator should be without them. And…please note that homemade ferments can be very powerful. Go slowly, folks! If you have never eaten homemade, real sauerkraut, or fermented pickles, or fruit kvass, take it slow. For those of us who have been eating dead food for a while, ferments can pack a wallop! That means that they can “provoke a detox reaction”. What is a detox reaction? Diarrhea, for one. Dizziness, headaches, aches in bones. At the extreme, vomiting. So go slowly. You just can’t down an entire jar of fermented salsa like you would a dead jar from the store dead zone. A teaspoon or a tablespoon at most to start, and work your way up. Don’t say I didn’t warn you!!

To learn how to ferment just about anything–vegetables, fruits, beverages, berries, grains, beans…you get the idea…! buy my book, with Love from Grandmother’s Kitchen: Traditional Cooking Techniques for Well-Being HERE. And stay tuned for an entire weekend of Cooking GAPS (TM) Style coming your way in Colorado, California, and Boston this year!!

For more about how much I love ferments, check out the Washington Post Food section article Fermentation: A Wild Way to Make Food Come to Life 🙂

Pickles and salsa

Fermented cucumbers, aka pickles and salsa! DEEEEEElish!

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I found the perfect bones…and my new favorite soup: oxtail!

Oh yes…it was a bit of an accident, but a happy one at that…I found the perfect bones for GAPSTM stock! I found the perfect bones for a nutrient-dense stock! I was in my local butcher shop, my local grass-fed only butcher shop and there they were…on the top shelf, calling to me. But first things first.

What is GAPSTM and what is the perfect stock for GAPSTM? I call GAPSTM a healing protocol. Short for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome, it aims to heal the gut lining and cure all sorts of dis-eases in the body including Autism, ADD, AD/HD, Aspberger’s, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, depression, allergies and auto-immune disorders. I have been making stock for a long time, and GAPSTM stock, or stock you make for yourself when you are on the GAPSTM diet is a special kind of stock to me. I will endeavor to explain.

When you make “bone broth”, or “nutrient-dense stock”, your goal is a volume of gelatinous stock (or a demi glace, but that is not usual.) Bones and vegetables are discarded after a long “rolling” or simmering…often 40-60 hours or more. When you are making GAPSTM stock, there are five things you are looking for: the stock, gelatin, tendons, meat and fat. You make the stock so that you may drink it or use it as the base of soups and stews. You may eat the gelatin in cubes if the stock is made well, just like jello! (Believe it or not, that red dye no. 5, high-fructose corn syrup laden cherry jello they serve to convalescing patients in hospitals has its origin in real gelatin from real stock! It is a truly healing food! How far we have digressed…) You are also to eat the tendons, the meat and the fat. It takes a special kind of bone to give you tendons, meat, and fat. And I have found it. The ox tail. (The bison tail works, too.)

Ox tails or bison tails make the best stock because they give everything you need: stock, gel, cartilage and tendons, meat, and fat. And oh, do they give FLAVOR.

So back to my story. A package of ox tail called to me from the top shelf of the refrigerator. I couldn’t believe how beautiful it was. Rich, red meat, beautiful white fat throughout, and lots of cartilage and tendons. I salivated as I saw it and I salivate as I write now.

I had never made oxtail soup or oxtail broth. I had never seen oxtail. I remember having oxtail soup when I was young, but when I asked mom about it the other day, it was a packaged soup mix. So I was on my own.

I consulted some cookbooks and then decided to strike out on my own…and it was tremendous. Stupendous. Unbelievably delicious. Deeply nourishing. The whole family delighted in it. My six year old said his “tummy was dancing” it was so happy. It was “the best soup I ever made”. Soooooooooo on to the recipe.

Oxtail is so heavy in fat, that you will have to cool it before you use it in a soup. So it’s a two step process, like any other good soup. Make the stock and then make the soup. But you’ll be saving and eating much of what you made the stock with.

Recipe I: Oxtail Stock

2 pounds of oxtail or bison tail, cut into 1 inch pieces

3 carrots, scrubbed and coarsely chopped

3 celery ribs, coarsely chopped

1 medium onion, coarsely chopped

You may choose to brown the oxtail before you make the stock. This will serve to intensify the flavor and color of your stock. Variation 1: Place the oxtails on a sheet pan and bake in a 350 F oven for 30-45 minutes, or Variation 2: melt some tallow, lard, or pastured butter in a skillet and brown both sides of the oxtail.

If you brown the oxtail, be sure to scrape all the juices and fat into the pan. Do not discard them.

So put the oxtail into a 6-8 quart Dutch oven and cover with water. Add the vegetables. Bring to a boil, skim and discard the scum. Lower heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for about 20 hours.

Strain and cool. Reserve all the meat and discard the vegetables. Chop the meat and fat and tendons and keep in a bowl or container while the stock cools. (Note: this step may take several hours or overnight in order to allow the fat to cool and harden.)

When the stock has cooled, take off the layer of fat and reserve for cooking (or adding back in to the oxtail soup when you make it.)

Recipe II: Oxtail Soup

2-3 quarts oxtail stock (or beef stock if you don’t have oxtail stock)

2-3 carrots, finely diced

2-3 celery ribs, finely diced

1-2 medium potato or turnip, finely diced

thyme, about 2 tsp dried or 2 T fresh

Celtic salt, to taste

freshly ground pepper

cayenne pepper, pinch

port or brandy, 2 T, (optional)

tomato paste, organic, about 3 T

reserved oxtail meat and fat

Place everything into a soup pot except the tomato paste, optional port and meat. Bring to a boil and skim and discard scum. Lower to a simmer and cover. Cook until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes.

Add tomato paste and stir until incorporated. Add optional port and meat and allow to heat through, about 4-5 minutes.

Serve with prepared horseradish, fresh ground pepper and sea salt. You may wish to add a tablespoon of fermented ketchup to your bowl just prior to that first bite! I did!

Hints: Grow Your Soup!

So you’ve enjoyed your first night of oxtail soup (or any other stock based soup) and there is a bit left, but not enough for another meal. Add more stock-oxtail or beef in this case- and a bit more tomato paste and thyme. It will not be as thick, but it will taste as good!

Another hint: if you need a hearty second meal, add some soaked wild or brown rice to the hint above. Now you’ve got a stew!

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This is a square of oxtail stock. I cut a square of gelled stock out of the bowl.

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