Tag Archives: bone broth

Edema? Eczema? A-fib? The One Pot Meal that Heals™

This is a story based on personal experience. It is not peer reviewed and has no footnotes for you. It is not academic (though I have plenty of stories of clients and students that have healed through food…). This is just a story of how a tremendously healing meal…one that is SO easy to make…so deeply nourishing…worked its magic in my own home. On symptoms we had NO IDEA it would clear.

The Gut and Psychology Syndrome™, aka, “GAPS” diet, is known mostly for its ability to heal symptoms of brain function that are connected to the relative health or damage of the gut. ADD, ADHD, Autism Spectrum, brain fog, dyslexia, dyspraxia, schizophrenia to name a few. I teach how to cook for the GAPS diet, and most of the people who attend or wish to work with me have those symptoms. I am used to the idea of eating to heal the gut, and subsequently, brain function. Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, author of the GAPS diet, has been saying for years (and I believe her) that all physical symptoms can be traced to the gut, a leaky gut, that is. She is currently writing the “Gut and Physiology Syndrome”…which says just that. But now, I got to see and experience first-hand, how the GAPS diet heals so many other things.

High blood sugar? Check.

High blood pressure? Check.

Atrial fibrillation? Check.

Arrhythmia? Check.

Severe Edema? Check.

Weight loss? Check.

Yep. All of the above symptoms back into normal range…or no longer symptoms, within just two months. These were chronic, entrenched symptoms, present for decades. And I didn’t even TRY to heal them.  No special diet, no “intake” done. It was merely the result of eating the way we eat in my home…organic whenever possible, no processed foods, no soda or soft drinks. And one other thing. We eat Meat Stock two or three times a week in my home. Yep. That’s it. Meat Stock.

 

meat stock photo

What IS “Meat Stock”? Meat Stock is what I call the “One Pot Meal that Heals™”… because that’s what it does. It heals. Meat Stock is the foundation of the GAPS diet, it is the food that provides the nutrients that heal a leaky gut…and then the symptoms of that leaky gut. Meat Stock is NOT just broth. It is NOT bone broth. It is faster to make, and more nutrient-dense than bone broth. Meat Stock is an entire MEAL…you eat the meat, you drink the stock that is made from the meat, and you eat the vegetables, (with liberal amounts of healthy traditional fats, like pastured butter, tallow, duck fat…and good, high mineral sea salt.) Meat Stock is made with any meat with a joint and connective tissue–chicken, turkey, duck, quail, beef, bison, lamb, pork, fish…It’s a one pot meal. Did I mention that it heals?

So what can Meat Stock heal?

Leaky gut and the symptoms that stem from it…everything mentioned above, including:

  • brain function  and nervous system disorders: ADD, ADHD, Autism Spectrum, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, SPD, OCD, depression, dyslexia, dyspraxia, brain fog…
  • digestive system disorders: IBS, Colitis, food allergies, constipation, diarrhea, bloating, SIBO, high blood sugar–hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia
  • skin disorders, most notably eczema…
  • autoimmune disorders (of which there are between 80-100 or more, depending on who you ask)
  • heart function disorders: arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation…
  • edema
  • asthma

If it could be as easy as changing your diet and eating a One Pot Meal that Heals™…aka, Meat Stock, wouldn’t you be interested? Even if it didn’t clear everything within two months, wouldn’t it be worth it? Imagine if you worked with someone to implement the GAPS diet over a period of six months –  two years, how much could be healed?!

For more information, including recipes…I wrote a book, Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet, Part I: Meat Stock and Bone Broth 

For more information about leaky gut-what it is and why you should heal it, see “What is a Leaky Gut, Anyway?

If you would like some guidance as you cook to heal your leaky gut and the symptoms that come from it, contact me.

Celtic Sea Salt

Gut and Psychology Syndrome

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Bone Broth does not heal a leaky gut!

Beef broth and vegetables

Nope. It does not–at least, according to the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) Diet. In fact, bone broth is not even mentioned in the diet! Can you believe it?  A little background here.

I came across the book Gut and Psychology Syndrome in 2007, in my search for healing diets specifically for children with autism spectrum and ADD or ADHD. I had read many others, parts of which included many things that I could see would work. But somehow, they never felt complete to me. That same year, nearly a decade ago, I was blessed to meet Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, author of the book and creator of the healing protocol for which the book is named at the 2007 annual conference of the Weston A. Price Foundation in Chantilly, Virginia. I remember that I drove out from my home in Silver Spring, Maryland specifically to hear Dr. Natasha’s talk on the Gut and Psychology Syndrome. That day, she talked for a mere hour and fifteen minutes, one of many other “track” speakers. (At nearly every conference since then, Dr. Natasha has presented an entire day on GAPS. This was the introduction of her work to “WAPers” and others who sought alternative healing based on traditional foods.)  As I sat and listened to her talk, tears welled up and I cried. I cried the tears of knowing that I had finally found someone with answers to why people were so sick. Why the children were so sick, and what could be done about it. The program she explained felt complete. It had the missing pieces. And it started with THE FOOD.

For those of you who know me, you know that I believe and have built my life’s work on the understanding that “food is the foundation”. Good food. Real food. Food that is raised in a sustainable way. Food that nourishes the land as it is grown, and the people that eat it. Food that is cooked in a way that preserves and maximizes nutrient value and digestibility. Food provides the building blocks, macro and micro-nutrients that the human body needs to thrive. It has come to be known as “nourishing, traditional food”, based on the principles of Dr. Weston A. Price, and the cookbook that Sally Fallon (Morell) published in 1998, Nourishing Traditions. To hear that day a medical doctor talk about how AUTISM could be healed through FOOD…how it worked and why it worked, was at the same time mind-blowing to me, and obviously simple. Of course it could. Of course it would. So, after that day, I set myself the task of learning the diet, inside and out, the nuances, the cooking techniques so that I could share them with anyone who would listen…and I do that to this day.

I developed cooking classes specific to the GAPS diet in 2010. When I was introduced to Dr. Joseph Mercola in 2011 by Dr. Natasha and her husband at the Wise Traditions Conference in Dallas, and they told him I had developed cooking classes for the GAPS diet, he used the term “ground breaking”. Yes, they were–and yes, they are, for I am still working to teach those techniques that are specific to GAPS, to clear up misunderstandings about cooking for the diet and how it works. I write, I blog, I speak, I teach. Wherever and whenever I can. When I realized the misunderstanding about bone broth that was going around the forums and list serves at that time–that moms all over the country were trying to implement the diet with bone broth–long cooked bone broth, full of glutamic acid (read “MSG”), which could trigger neurological symptoms in those that had them (read “autistic children”) had to be corrected. There is no bone broth in GAPS, folks. The stock that Dr. Natasha writes about is clearly Meat Stock. Short cooked stock, made from meaty bones with joints and connective tissue. Yes, you can throw in marrow bones for their added goodness, but they are not the main ingredients.

In order to get the word out and clear up the confusion between bone broth and meat stock, I started writing a series of books called Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet. Eventually, there will be four parts to the series, explaining the very important nuances of cooking for this healing protocol. This is not the “well” diet, folks. It is a therapeutic diet, that is designed to produced therapeutic results. Part I of my series of books (available as ebooks to get the word out, pdfs and print editions), the most important part, is called “Meat Stock and Bone Broth“. My publisher, Selene River Press (a fabulous publisher that carries select books on nutrition and health based on the works of Dr. Royal Lee) puts it like this: “Bringing new clarity to the GAPS diet in non-clinical language all readers can understand, expert chef, author, and teacher Monica Corrado shores up a critical but often misunderstood aspect of the GAPS healing protocol—meat stock and bone broth. When you make them. How you make them. Why you make them. And, crucially, why you shouldn’t mix them up.”

I invite you to take a read of my book on Meat Stock and Bone Broth. I also invite you to experience the most healing part of the GAPS diet, the “Intro” with me during what I am calling “Jump Start: GAPS”, an online program I am offering February 20 – 27. An easy, inexpensive way to access me, a Certified GAPS Practitioner and a Teaching Chef, and have your questions answered. More info about Jump Start: GAPS here.

 

More about the GAPS Diet

More about Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride

Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet Part I: Meat Stock and Bone Broth

Part II: Culturing Dairy

Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon Morell

Weston A. Price Foundation

Dr. Royal Lee

 

Note: Some of the above are affiliate links. Thank you for supporting my writing.

 

 

 

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What is a Leaky Gut, anyway?!

And why should you care?
There’s a lot of talk these days about a “leaky gut”. What is it? Why should you care?

The part of the “gut” that the term refers to is the duodenum of the small intestine. The duodenum is the first part of the small intestine into which the stomach dumps its high acid mixture for further digestion and absorption. If that part of the small intestine has holes in it or is damaged, it is termed “leaky”. That’s because it leaks. Into the bloodstream…your bloodstream. The transportation system of the body, the one that carries nutrients to cells, and wastes away from cells…read on.

What leaks out of the small intestine into the blood stream? Large molecules of food that have not been broken down by that damaged area. This is highly problematic for many reasons, a few of which follow:
  1. Your food has not been digested, so your body will not get the nutrients from the food. If this goes on for a long time, you will be malnourished, and suffer the symptoms that that brings.
  2. Your food has not been digested, so large molecules will leak into the bloodstream. If they are protein molecules, the body will recognize them as “foreign proteins”, and launch an immune response. If this goes on for a long time, you will likely develop autoimmune disorders.
  3. Foreign food molecules in the bloodstream mean that you will develop food sensitivities. In the beginning, just a few sensitivities. As time goes on, your body will become highly reactive to many foods.
  4. Toxins will also leak into the bloodstream, which will go to the brain and cause focusing issues, brain fog, and inability to concentrate. If this goes on for a while, ADD, ADHD, OCD, SPD, depression, and mood swings–think bipolar– can develop. Schizophrenia has also been indicated.
Okay, so if all of that is probable with a leaky gut, why not heal it? It’s easy once you know how.
For more information about the best protocol I know to heal AND seal the gut, check out http://www.gaps.me/.
If you would like to learn how to cook to heal your gut, join me for informative, inspiring, and fun classes! I’ll be teaching in Fort Collins, Colorado on Saturday and Sunday, May 16 and 17…”Heal Your Leaky Gut: Cooking for the GAPS Diet”. Easy peasy when you know how. And that’s exactly my intention: to teach you how! More information about the cooking weekend here: http://goo.gl/BlJpQL

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Learn to cook for the GAPS Diet! Cooking Immersion Weekend!

 

Gut and Psychology Syndrome CoverOne of the best diets to heal a leaky gut and gut dysbiosis…as well as the myriad of symptoms that result from these conditions…is the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (aka “G.A.P.S.”) diet. I have been teaching how to cook for the diet for about 5 years now, having developed one of the first sets of cooking classes for it. I have offered these classes individually over a series of weeks, and also all together over a weekend workshop as far away as California, Massachusetts, and Maryland. This coming weekend, and next month, I am inaugurating a new method which I am calling “Cooking Immersion Weekends”.

The Cooking Immersion Weekend grew out of the desire to provide a way for individuals to experience learning and cooking with all the techniques needed for the diet at one time, with other people, and with a resource right with them to answer any questions. (Me.)

I have broken up the weekends as makes the most sense: one for the “Intro” diet and another for the “Full” Diet, as cooking for them is very different. The Intro Immersion Weekend will take place this weekend, 4pm Friday through 1pm Sunday, September 2-14, 2014,  in a retreat setting at Sunrise Ranch in Loveland, CO. The Full Immersion Weekend will take place same times and place, on October 3-5, 2014.

My desire and intention for those that join me for these Cooking Immersions is that they leave feeling fully confident in their ability to implement the healing protocol when they return home. (You all know how much I love to make things easy for folks and to take the mystery out of seemingly complicated cooking techniques!)

These are very hands-on weekends; we spend a lot of time in the kitchen together. 🙂  And though those of you who have been cooking traditional food for a while will have a broader knowledge base than those who have not, cooking for the GAPS diet is very different than cooking from Nourishing Traditions. So….

You are invited to attend one or both of the weekends!

Still on the fence? Here is what Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride wrote about my cooking classes:  ” Dear Monica, I just want to thank you for your wonderful GAPS cooking classes! I am getting excellent reports from the GAPS Practitioners and patients! Everybody who attended your classes leave very inspired and ready to cook good food. Thank you!”

CGPs (Certified GAPS Practitioners) are especially welcome, as knowing how to cook for the diet is critical to its success.

You may register for the September 12-14 Cooking Immersion Weekend here.

You may register for the October 3-5 Cooking Immersion Weekend here.

 

Looking forward to cooking with you!

 

 

Please note: Gut and Psychology Syndrome is the trademark and copyright of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. The right of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Patent and Designs Act 1988.

 

 

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Meat Stock…What it is, and Why I Love it! And you will, too…

I LOVE meat stock. I love meat stock. Meat stock.

I also love bone broth. But meat stock is different than bone broth.

In the world of stock and broth…I am speaking especially to those following the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) diet…and those who are consuming a lot of stock on a daily basis…to heal their guts, to take in electrolytic minerals, to supply them with easily absorbed nutrients…somehow “meat stock” has been missed. And what a fatal flaw that is, because meat stock makes your life sooooo much easier-both for those on the GAPS diet, and for those of us other folks, who are just trying to eat well to be well.

Image

Meat stock is a treasure in the world of nutrient-dense foods… for those of us who are “real foodies”, Weston A. Price-ers, “traditional foodies”…and anyone who is wanting to make the most of their food dollar and their health. Most of us, that is.

The clue is in the words…”meat” stock and “bone” broth. They say a lot about the differences between the two. One is made from meat that has some bones; the other is made from bones. One is cooked for a relatively short time; the other for a very long time, sometimes up to 72 hours!

The gift of meat stock is threefold: it gives you a meal to eat and gelatinous broth to drink. Then it gives you bones you may use as boney bones for bone broth! What a deal!!

So here’s how it’s done. Please take care to use the best quality poultry or meat that you can buy. That means pastured poultry or grass-fed meat. It matters…to the Earth, the animals, and to our bodies.

Meat Stock by Monica

Obtain 2-3 pounds of meat with a bone in it. (This can be legs or thighs or quarters of a chicken or turkey or other fowl…it can be a whole or half chicken cut up. Please include the skin. Lamb shanks…beef shanks…ox tails…meaty neck bones…you get the idea.) Place the meaty bones in a 4-6 quart Dutch oven. (You may also use a crock pot if you prefer; this will lengthen the cook time. See below.)

Cover with water. Usually 1.5-2 quarts of pure, cold water

Add herbs that you love. Fresh rosemary or thyme…tied is best, so you may remove them later…and a slight handful of black or green peppercorns, whole.

Add any vegetables that you love…the usual candidates are carrots, celery and onion, but you could add other veggies if you like–mushrooms, zucchini. (Do not use potatoes or sweet potatoes or any starchy vegetables…they will cloud the stock. Stay away from broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage at this stage, they will turn the stock bitter, and you will wind up throwing it out. Boo. 😦 ) If you use carrots, celery and onion, I would use 3, 3, 1 or 3, 2, 1 or so. Onions can overpower if you add too many.

Bring to a boil over high heat.

Skim and discard any scum that surfaces. 

After you have skimmed most of the scum off of the top of the water, lower the heat to a simmer and cover the pot. (Note: do not spend a lot of time on this. You can lose some of the glorious fat if you do. Hint: wait until there is a good amount of scum on the surface, and then begin to skim. It will look like white foam, and may become quite thick depending on the quality of the bones you used.)

Cook, covered. 

If it is poultry, cook 1.5-2 hours.

If it is lamb, cook 3-4 hours

If it is beef or bison, cook 4-6 hours, or longer (8-10 most)

(If you are using a crock pot, double the hours approximately.)

Serve. 

When you serve, serve the meat and the vegetables and a cup of stock on the side to drink. (Remember to add good quality Celtic sea salt and pastured butter or ghee. The salt will give you trace minerals your body needs, and the healthy fat will help your body to absorb the vitamins from the food.)

Mmmmmmmmmmmmm so good and healing and warming on these cold, snowy Winter days.

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Gelatinous meat stock

NEXT

Save the bones for your next round of bone broth. If you don’t have enough to start a batch right away, (approx. 4 pound of chicken bones or 7 pounds of beef or bison bones), you may wish to store them in a freezer bag once they’ve cooled. For more information about making bone broth from those leftover bones, check out my article, Healing Soups series: Let’s Step Back to Stock https://simplybeingwell.wordpress.com/2012/01/27/healing-soups-series-lets-step-back-to-stock/

Enjoy!!

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