Tag Archives: cooking for well-being

Tools to Soothe and Stabilize!

Some of you may not know that my company, Simply Being Well, celebrated its 10 year anniversary last year. Ten years!

Simply Being Well began with the tagline: Herbs, Oils, Essences, and Whole Foods. I started with a desire to share my knowledge of alternative healing modalities with everyone–especially moms and those who wanted to be moms someday. I offered classes and workshops, and had a private practice. Simply Being Well evolved to focus on teaching cooking classes and training Traditional Food Cooks and Teachers based on Weston A. Price and the cookbook, Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig. That’s where Cooking for Well-Being came from.

I taught my first cooking class on a six foot table at a local food co-op in Bethesda, Maryland, in September of 2006, after being asked to “teach Nourishing Traditions”. Who knew that first class would be the catalyst for 10 years of teaching cooking?! I loved it. I still do! And I believe, in my heart of hearts, that “food is the foundationTM” of well-being. That’s why I continue to teach Cooking for Well-Being, and help people to source clean, sustainable food, and guide people through their healing journeys with food–nourishing, traditional food and, specifically, the Gut and Psychology Syndrome–GAPS–Diet, since 2010.

All along, however, I have continued to work with clients, offering various vibrational remedies to support them on their way. That is still very much a part of Simply Being Well and my Wellness Consultations. Flower essences, therapeutic grade essential oils and other alternative modalities can be very powerful assistants on one’s way to heath. (For more information about the Vibrational Cause of Chronic Disease, see my article here). So, while “food is the foundation” of Well-Being, it’s not the only thing. Remedies from the plant kingdom can surely help ease the way, and I test for specific remedies to clear the cause of specific symptoms for clients.

In times of chronic stress, trial, or turbulence, we need all the tools we can get to help us maintain alignment and stability. It is this knowing that has led me to offer a series of videos on “Tools to Soothe and Stabilize”. There are very simple things we can do to help ourselves, our families, our children, our pets to weather storms with more ease. It is my hope that these short clips will help you on your way.

You may find them on my YouTube channel (subscribe!), and on my Simply Being Well: Cooking for Wellbeing Facebook Page.

Here’s the link to the first Tools to Soothe and Stabilize I hope it serves you well!

 

For Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig,

For the Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Natasha Campbell-McBride

Please note these are affiliate links.
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Cook those bones! Turkey Stock recipe…!

One of my favorite things about the day after Thanksgiving is putting the carcass and all the bones up for turkey stock! For those of you who would like one, here’s a recipe. Enjoy!!

Ummm Ummm…Turkey Stock!

bones and carcass

skin (unless you prefer to make cracklins with yours!)

pure cold water to cover (depending on the size of the bird and the size of your pot, you will need approximately 4-6 quarts of water. Just be sure that all the bones in the pot are covered by about an inch of water.)

1/2 cup mild vinegar (apple cider vinegar works well)

3 carrots, washed and chopped coarsely

3 celery sticks, washed and chopped coarsely

1 large onion, rinsed and quartered (if it is organic, throw the skins in too–they will lend beautiful color to your stock)

slight handful of black peppercorns

  • Place the bones and skin in a heavy gauge, 18/10 stainless steel stock pot. (The best stock pots are tall and narrow, so that there is not a large surface area which will cause you to lose stock as it simmers.)
  • Cover with pure, cold water. (See above about how much. Too much water will keep your stock from becoming gelatinous when it is cooled in the refrigerator later.)
  • Add vinegar and let stand for 30 minutes-1 hour at room temperature. (The vinegar will work to draw the minerals out of the bones into the stock.)
  • Bring the pot to a boil, skim and discard the scum. (You may use a flat spoon, a ladle or a skimmer–love them!–to skim the scum. Skimming is an art. You don’t want to skim off all the fat with the scum, or you will have a very flat-tasting stock. I suggest waiting until you see a lot of little bubbles on the top of the stock, and then skim for a few minutes. If the bones are good, you will not need to skim very long.)
Turkey stock with scum

Turkey stock with scum. I added the vegetables with the bones, so I’ll have fun skimming around the veggies!

  • Add the vegetables. (You may choose to add the vegetables prior to bringing the pot to a boil. Either way is fine–earlier or later in the process. If you place the vegetables in with the bones, you will have the pleasure of skimming around all the veggies. Some people love that…some would rather put them in after skimming the scum, so they don’t have to go around them.)
Skimming the scum off turkey stock

Skimming the scum off the turkey stock. I am using a skimmer, but you could also use a spoon or ladle, which I did for years!

  • Bring the pot to a boil again if you just added vegetables.
  • Lower the heat to a simmer. The temperature that your stock cooks at is important. You will be at a perfect temperature when you see movement under a relatively still top of the stock.
  • Simmer for 25-35 hours or so. (Note: You do not need to leave the pot on continuously if you do not want to. You may use what I call “cumulative time”; that is, adding up the time you simmer it. Each time you turn it off, just remember to bring the pot to a boil upon returning and skim and discard the scum. Then turn the heat back down to a simmer. 🙂 )
  • You will know that the stock is “done” when all of the cartilage has been dissolved and you can crumble the bones in your hands with light pressure.
  • Strain the stock and cool to room temperature before placing it in the refrigerator. Hint: a long and shallow pan will allow the stock to cool more quickly because of the increased surface area.

Here’s what the stock should look like when it is cooled:

cooled turkey stock

Cooled turkey stock! The top layer is fat; very good for cooking!

 

Cooled stock in hand

When the stock is truly gelatinous, you can cut a cube and hold it in your hand!

Enjoy!

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Toss those Calcium Supplements!

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Don’t believe it when those calcium supplements say “absorbable” on the label. Most calcium pills or chewables are not absorbed by the body and end up in your toilet at best, OR in places in your body where they are not supposed to be at worst. They certainly do NOT end up in your bones!!!

I am teaching a series of food-based calcium classes starting tomorrow in Fort Collins. It is a series I first developed and delivered more than six years ago at Crossings: A Center for the Healing Traditions, in Silver Spring, Maryland, as part of a Menopause Series I created at the time. I am revisiting the material and tweaking it; I SO enjoy the crafting and creation of classes. (And the delivery of course!)

I am reviving these classes because I KNOW they are so important. I am offering these classes because I am now personally experiencing a deep need for calcium on a daily basis. “Why?” you ask. Because I myself am on the brink of menopause. And you? Are you pre-menopausal or menopausal? Do you have osteoporosis? Are you a woman of child-bearing age? Pregnant? A nursing mom? The reality is that ALL bodies need calcium. Women, men, children. For very good reasons. And we are not getting enough of it in our diets…for lots of reasons…inferior milk and dairy products from conventional sources, low-fat diets, a lack of Vitamins A, D and K…

Yes, all bodies need calcium. Growing children need calcium for strong bones. Women need calcium during the child-bearing years, during pregnancy, lactation, pre-menopause, during menopause and after.  Susun Weed says: “Calcium is, without a doubt, the most important mineral in your body. In fact, calcium makes up more than half of the total mineral content of your body. Calcium is crucial to the regular beating of your heart, your metabolism, the functioning of your muscles, the flow of impulses along your nerves, the regulation of your cellular membranes, the strength of your bones, the health of your teeth and gums, and your vital blood- clotting mechanisms. Calcium is so critical to your life that you have a gland (the parathyroid) that does little else than monitor blood levels of calcium and secrete hormones to insure optimum levels of calcium at all times.” WOW. Calcium. Very important, I’d say. Really a good idea to be sure you are getting enough calcium IN YOUR DIET. The foods you eat and the beverages you drink. And I am not talking about more dairy, folks. (Although fresh, raw dairy IS one of the best sources of easily assimilated calcium for the body!)

There are all sorts of things we eat on a regular basis that are “calcium antagonists”, substances that contribute to calcium loss (those that cause calcium to leach from the bones) or interfere with its utilization in the body. Most people consume them on a daily basis. OY. Some of the worst calcium antagonists are coffee and carbonated beverages, aka soda, or pop. More on those two another time. (Gotta keep you reading! 😉 )

So…I am teaching a class on Food Sources of Calcium tomorrow night, July 25, and another on High Calcium Teas and Vinegars on Thursday, August 22, in Fort Collins. I hope you will join me to learn about how you can have more easily absorbed calcium in your diet…and how to ensure it IS absorbed! You may find more information at http://www.cookingforwell-being.com/Classes.html. Go to Calendar. I look forward to cooking with you! Oh yes, this will be fun!!!

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Now Here’s an Idea – Learn To Teach Traditional Cooking!

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The Inaugural class of Cooking for Well-Being Teacher Training! August 2012

Want to know the story behind Cooking for Well-Being, how it started and where I am going? Check out my article on The Healthy Home Economist blog…I am the featured guest blogger today! Thanks to Sarah Pope for the opportunity!

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Book testimonial…!

Hi folks,

I wanted to share this one with you … a testimonial about my new book, with Love from Grandmother’s Kitchen: Traditional Cooking Techniques for Well-Being

“Good Heavens to Murgatroid! as Landon would say!! If I had known how great this book was going to be, I would have ordered more than just two copies — one for me and one for MHF. It’s like having all the notes and charts you’ve scattered all about the house neatly encapsulated in a small kitchen DRAWER. It’s like having Monica Corrado at your shoulder when you need her. What was I THINKING?!? The binding is brilliant, the format and type are brilliant, the content is brilliant, it is BRILIG and doth teach you well. It is compact and concise but nutrient-dense. It might be Monica’s first book, but I don’t think even SHE can do better. THIS is the book you need. And you know who you are! TRUST ME!! Get it now and start the New Year off right. And no, I don’t work for Monica. And I didn’t even gush about Joel Salatin’s latest book. But I’m gushing about this one. TRUST ME!!  P.Hannam,VA

Thanks, P!!

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My first book…buy yours NOW!

I am happy to announce my first book (I say that because I have many more on the agenda!)…

with Love from Grandmother’s Kitchen: Traditional Cooking Techniques for Well-Beingcover with Love from Grandmother's Kitchen

The book covers all the techniques you need to cook nourishing, traditional food!

***For more information about the book, including sample pages and info about content, click HERE***

Due out 11/11/11! (How auspicious!)

Order yours today!

If you would like to purchase more than 5 copies, or if you would like to order in bulk or wholesale, kindly contact me directly at simplybeingwell at gmail.com!

Special thanks to Amy Berger for her research and contribution and to Jessica Haney, editor, without whose tireless work this would not have been published! 

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new classes added for October…

Come on out for a class, folks! I am looking forward to being “back in the saddle” again. (ha ha–get it, I’m in Colorado now! 😉 )

Beans and Whole Grains for Autumn! Saturday, October 22…Cheyenne, WY

Liver! Love it and Eat it! Saturday, October 29…Fort Collins, CO

For details and to register, see the schedule of classes! http://simplybeingwell.com/2011-class-schedule/

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