Tag Archives: paleo

Making pate’ for 200 at Fourfold Healing

So I received a call last Monday that I needed to make pate’ for about 200 people on Thursday for the Fourfold Path to Healing conference in Baltimore. I thought, “Fun! Fun! Fun!” and so it was.

After a flurry of calculations and number crunching, I extended the recipes I had. (Most people don’t know that chefs need to be mathematicians too!) Ordered 20 pounds of beef liver and 17 pounds of pork liver and everything needed, and I was off to Baltimore.

Here are some of the photos from growing those recipes. And yes, it was so much fun. AND delicious!! (“Delightful” one woman said, “best pate’ I have ever had” said another…and from Sally Fallon Morell, “really good”. Thanks, all! ) and special thanks to dear friend and “right arm”, Susan Lucas, who was with me through it all!)

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I found the perfect bones…and my new favorite soup: oxtail!

Oh yes…it was a bit of an accident, but a happy one at that…I found the perfect bones for GAPSTM stock! I found the perfect bones for a nutrient-dense stock! I was in my local butcher shop, my local grass-fed only butcher shop and there they were…on the top shelf, calling to me. But first things first.

What is GAPSTM and what is the perfect stock for GAPSTM? I call GAPSTM a healing protocol. Short for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome, it aims to heal the gut lining and cure all sorts of dis-eases in the body including Autism, ADD, AD/HD, Aspberger’s, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, depression, allergies and auto-immune disorders. I have been making stock for a long time, and GAPSTM stock, or stock you make for yourself when you are on the GAPSTM diet is a special kind of stock to me. I will endeavor to explain.

When you make “bone broth”, or “nutrient-dense stock”, your goal is a volume of gelatinous stock (or a demi glace, but that is not usual.) Bones and vegetables are discarded after a long “rolling” or simmering…often 40-60 hours or more. When you are making GAPSTM stock, there are five things you are looking for: the stock, gelatin, tendons, meat and fat. You make the stock so that you may drink it or use it as the base of soups and stews. You may eat the gelatin in cubes if the stock is made well, just like jello! (Believe it or not, that red dye no. 5, high-fructose corn syrup laden cherry jello they serve to convalescing patients in hospitals has its origin in real gelatin from real stock! It is a truly healing food! How far we have digressed…) You are also to eat the tendons, the meat and the fat. It takes a special kind of bone to give you tendons, meat, and fat. And I have found it. The ox tail. (The bison tail works, too.)

Ox tails or bison tails make the best stock because they give everything you need: stock, gel, cartilage and tendons, meat, and fat. And oh, do they give FLAVOR.

So back to my story. A package of ox tail called to me from the top shelf of the refrigerator. I couldn’t believe how beautiful it was. Rich, red meat, beautiful white fat throughout, and lots of cartilage and tendons. I salivated as I saw it and I salivate as I write now.

I had never made oxtail soup or oxtail broth. I had never seen oxtail. I remember having oxtail soup when I was young, but when I asked mom about it the other day, it was a packaged soup mix. So I was on my own.

I consulted some cookbooks and then decided to strike out on my own…and it was tremendous. Stupendous. Unbelievably delicious. Deeply nourishing. The whole family delighted in it. My six year old said his “tummy was dancing” it was so happy. It was “the best soup I ever made”. Soooooooooo on to the recipe.

Oxtail is so heavy in fat, that you will have to cool it before you use it in a soup. So it’s a two step process, like any other good soup. Make the stock and then make the soup. But you’ll be saving and eating much of what you made the stock with.

Recipe I: Oxtail Stock

2 pounds of oxtail or bison tail, cut into 1 inch pieces

3 carrots, scrubbed and coarsely chopped

3 celery ribs, coarsely chopped

1 medium onion, coarsely chopped

You may choose to brown the oxtail before you make the stock. This will serve to intensify the flavor and color of your stock. Variation 1: Place the oxtails on a sheet pan and bake in a 350 F oven for 30-45 minutes, or Variation 2: melt some tallow, lard, or pastured butter in a skillet and brown both sides of the oxtail.

If you brown the oxtail, be sure to scrape all the juices and fat into the pan. Do not discard them.

So put the oxtail into a 6-8 quart Dutch oven and cover with water. Add the vegetables. Bring to a boil, skim and discard the scum. Lower heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for about 20 hours.

Strain and cool. Reserve all the meat and discard the vegetables. Chop the meat and fat and tendons and keep in a bowl or container while the stock cools. (Note: this step may take several hours or overnight in order to allow the fat to cool and harden.)

When the stock has cooled, take off the layer of fat and reserve for cooking (or adding back in to the oxtail soup when you make it.)

Recipe II: Oxtail Soup

2-3 quarts oxtail stock (or beef stock if you don’t have oxtail stock)

2-3 carrots, finely diced

2-3 celery ribs, finely diced

1-2 medium potato or turnip, finely diced

thyme, about 2 tsp dried or 2 T fresh

Celtic salt, to taste

freshly ground pepper

cayenne pepper, pinch

port or brandy, 2 T, (optional)

tomato paste, organic, about 3 T

reserved oxtail meat and fat

Place everything into a soup pot except the tomato paste, optional port and meat. Bring to a boil and skim and discard scum. Lower to a simmer and cover. Cook until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes.

Add tomato paste and stir until incorporated. Add optional port and meat and allow to heat through, about 4-5 minutes.

Serve with prepared horseradish, fresh ground pepper and sea salt. You may wish to add a tablespoon of fermented ketchup to your bowl just prior to that first bite! I did!

Hints: Grow Your Soup!

So you’ve enjoyed your first night of oxtail soup (or any other stock based soup) and there is a bit left, but not enough for another meal. Add more stock-oxtail or beef in this case- and a bit more tomato paste and thyme. It will not be as thick, but it will taste as good!

Another hint: if you need a hearty second meal, add some soaked wild or brown rice to the hint above. Now you’ve got a stew!

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This is a square of oxtail stock. I cut a square of gelled stock out of the bowl.

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Healing Soups series…let’s step back to Stock.

Can’t believe I started a Healing Soups series without first writing about Stock…aka, meat stock…bone broth. Maybe it’s because I am immersed in stock right now, (not literally, don’t worry!) I am making stock like crazy for a little boy who has had the flu, and for the rest of us who want to stay well…I am teaching a Making Stock GAPS ™ Style tomorrow morning in Westminster, CO, and I am readying for my stock class which I will be teaching at the Fourfold Path to Healing Conference in Baltimore one week from today. So…….I thought I’d share with you an article I wrote for Edible Chesapeake Magazine, which was published in November 2009. It appeared under the Cooking Fresh heading. Unfortunately for those in the Chesapeake Bay watershed area, Edible Chesapeake folded a few months later.  Here’s the article. I hope you enjoy it!

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s Healing Soup. hmmmm…..wonder what it will be?! 😉

Nutrient-Dense Stock…the Foundation of all Great Soup

By Monica Corrado

Mmm…mmm, there is nothing like a bowl of homemade soup when the weather starts to chill, and there is nothing better than soup made with homemade stock. Stock made well is a nutrient-dense elixir that gives a great bang for your nutritional buck: It is high in calcium and other minerals your body needs that are easily absorbed, it can reduce the amount of protein you eat, and the gelatin has been known to help heal many digestive and other disorders, including anemia, diabetes, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and even cancer1. Gelatinous stock is liquid nutrition for lactating mothers, menopausal women and children, whose bones are growing. It is also a perfect first food for infants.

As in all things, the quality of in the raw ingredients determines the quality of the final product. Bones from a grass-fed producer is the key to a rich, gelatinous stock. Bones from cows raised on feed-lots and chickens raised in cages just do not gel. You will need two types of bones for your stock: what I like to call “boney” bones, like marrow and knuckle bones; and “meaty bones,” such as chuck ribs or neck bones. Boney bones yield gelatin and minerals, while meaty bones will ensure rich color and flavor.

Next, the vegetables. Again, source counts. In these days of depleted soil, even organic vegetables can be low in minerals. Look for vegetables from farmers who add vital nutrients back into the soil, such as biodynamic farmers. If you can’t get biodynamic, grow your own, or go to a farmers market for fresh, local produce. Check with the farmer to find out what he or she is doing to help heal the earth.

1  For more information about the use of gelatin to heal the digestive tract and other disorders, see Gut and Psychology Syndrome: Natural Treatment for Autism, Dyspraxia, ADD, ADHD, Dyslexia, Depression and Schizophrenia, by Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD; “Why Broth is Beautiful,” in Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts, Spring 2003, by Kaayla T. Daniel, MS CCN; Gelatin in Nutrition and Medicine, by N.R. Gotthoffer; Hydrophilic Colloid Diet, by F.M. Pottenger, MD; Restoring Your Digestive Health: How the Guts and Glory Program Can Transform Your Life, by Jordan Rubin, NMD and Joseph Brasco; and the Weston A. Price Foundation at www.westonaprice.org.


 

the pot ready to roll

A pot of beef stock, ready to "roll"!

Beef Stock

about 4 pounds boney bones, marrow or knuckle bones

about 3 pounds meaty bones, chuck ribs or neck bones

4 quarts pure water

3 celery ribs, coarsely chopped

3 carrots, coarsely chopped

3 onions, coarsely chopped

¼ cup raw vinegar, such as apple cider vinegar

Roast meaty bones in the oven at 350 degrees until browned, about an hour or so. Meanwhile, place boney bones in a large, heavy stock pot with the vinegar and water and let soak for 1 hour. The vinegar will act on the bones and help to draw out the calcium and the gelatin for a rich stock. When the meaty bones are browned, add to the pot, along with any accumulated juices and the vegetables.

Bring the pot to a boil; skim the scum, and lower to a simmer. Do not cover the pot. The stock should be fairly still on the surface with movement underneath. (I call this “rolling”.) Roll the stock for a minimum of 24 and a maximum of 72 hours, and then strain. The longer you roll the stock, the more concentrated it will become. (Be sure to keep the bones covered with water throughout, unless you want a demi glace.) Pour into a low pan to bring to room temperature quickly (within 4 hours), and then cool in the refrigerator. Remove fat from the top of the stock and save to cook with later. As a saturated fat, beef tallow is one of the healthiest fats to cook foods at high temperatures. Under the fat you will find thick, rich gelatin. If the stock has not gelled, you may wish to add a good-quality gelatin to the stock when you use it in recipes. (Bernard Jensen produces a high-quality gelatin; see http://www.radiantlifecatalog.com.)

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