Tag Archives: traditional food

The Juggling Act that is GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome™) or, “Keep these three balls in the air”

three-colorful-juggling-balls-isolated-on-white-background_bv-teknjyl.jpg

As many of you know, I have been teaching how to cook nourishing, traditional foods a la Weston A. Price and Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions Cookbook for more than 11 years now, since 2006. I started teaching how to cook for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ (GAPS) Diet in 2010, and have so far published two of my four part series on Cooking Techniques for the GAPS Diet–Meat Stock and Bone Broth, and Culturing Dairy. (Lacto-fermentation is due out by the end of this year…to be followed by Nuts and Seeds). I wrote the books with the aim to help clear up confusion about the diet and make the cooking “GAPS-style” easy. I took the training to become a Certified GAPS Practitioner in 2015, and have been working with people to heal their guts for years–young, old, and in between.

(I would like to say one thing clearly here, before I continue with this article on juggling: The GAPS diet is about the FOOD, folks. The food. Before you try all sorts of supplements and vitamins and healing modalities for your or your child’s symptoms, try the diet first. Give it time to work. Hang in there. Ask for help if you need it. It took time to get this far out of balance in your body, it is going to take time to bring it back on line. And we have seen tremendous healing happen by following the diet, by the food alone.)

Okay, back to the Juggling Act that is GAPS!

While implementing the GAPS diet, I have found that there are 3 things that you must juggle at once as you go through it—it is a balancing act, and all three parts must be maintained (kept in the air, if you will), if you are going to succeed. I am writing this article to bring this to your attention…because I know it will help in implementing the nutritional protocol, and ultimately, bring relief and speed healing.

First, Stop Injury. That means to remove all of the foods and ingredients and toxins that could further damage the lining of the small intestine. These are gluten, casein, and complex carbohydrates (aka starches), fibrous vegetables, as well as dyes, preservatives, soy, GMOs, and other food fractions that could be problematic. (For a full list, see Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride’s book.)

Second, Heal and Seal. Healing and sealing is the role of Meat Stock, that delicious, nutritious “one pot meal that heals™”. Put very simply, the amino acids provide the building blocks for healing, and the gelatin does the sealing. (In my classes, I have often used the loose analogy of a brick wall: the amino acids are the bricks and the gelatin is the mortar. You get the idea. If there are holes in the mortar, things are going to get through–in this case, into the bloodstream. Need to Heal it and Seal it!) For more information about the role of meat stock, how to make it, and why it is the only stock used during the Intro of the GAPS Diet, see my article here. (Heck, it’s so important that I wrote a whole book about it!) In order to work its healing magic, it is a good idea to drink what I call ” a therapeutic dose” of meat stock every day–at least three, but better 4-6 eight ounce cups per day. (You will drink less when you have Healed and Sealed…that is, once you graduate to the Full GAPS diet.)

Thirdly, Repopulate the Gut with Healthy Microbes. One must turn the tide of dysbiosis, a situation where pathogenic bacteria reign supreme in the intestine.  In the GAPS diet, one repopulates the gut with beneficial bacteria with FOOD. It is the role of lacto-ferments (beet kvass, cabbage tonic, sauerkraut, fruit kvass) and cultured dairy in all of its forms (yogurt, cultured cream, sour(ed) cream-raw only- and kefir). People also use probiotic supplements, to increase the number of microbes in the system quickly. (It is very easy to add another 10, 20, or even hundreds of billion lacto-bacilli when taking a pill or a powder. There is only so much kraut one can eat in a day!)

I have no problem with probiotic supplements, in fact, often the addition of a good quality probiotic can help to clear tenacious symptoms when used in concert with the food. There are even a few that I recommend (see below), specifically because they are “clean” (contain no fillers and are “GAPS compliant”). Remember that when on GAPS, a probiotic may not contain FOS, inulin, or other prebiotics. They are starches or fiber, and will either “feed the bad guys” (pathogenic bacteria or opportunistic bacteria) or they will damage the gut. (See step one above: Stop Injury. Fiber can be like sandpaper to the gut wall. Since food travels down our alimentary canal, it will hit the damaged area first–the duodenum of the small intestine–before it gets to where it can be used, the colon.) So once you have found a probiotic without prebiotics in it, be sure that it has multiple strains (more than 12 is a good place to start).

I encourage you to keep these three things in mind–in balance, actually–as you travel along the road of healing your leaky gut with the GAPS nutritional protocol. One more time with feeling, here are those three things: 1. Stop Injury. 2. Heal and Seal. 3. Repopulate the Gut with Beneficial Microbes. These three things are all equally important. For example, if you are taking hundreds of billions of probiotics every day (which I don’t recommend–more on that later), but not drinking a therapeutic dose of meat stock EVERY day, you may be winning the battle of dysbiosis, but you won’t be Healing and Sealing. If you drink your meat stock every day, but don’t cut out all the foods that are damaging, (potatoes, or grains, or sugar, for example), you are continuing to blow holes in the small intestine, and continuing to feed pathogens. The gut will never seal, (like a wound that keeps getting the band-aid ripped off) and the bad guys-pathogens-will win. Makes sense? So GAPS is a juggling act, my friends. Keep all three balls in the air, and you win. It has been my experience, as I work with all sorts of individuals wanting to heal all sorts of symptoms with this diet, that if you can keep all the balls in the air, mindful of all the pieces at once, you will have a much better chance at moving through the protocol with ease and with better returns, faster.

Until next time, keep those balls in the air, folks!

 

Probiotics that are “GAPS legal”:

Biokult

Gut Pro

Gut Pro Infant

Custom Probiotics

My Books:

Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ (GAPS) Diet, Part I: Meat Stock and Bone Broth

Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ (GAPS) Diet, Part II: Culturing Dairy

Recipe for Fruit Kvass

More information on the GAPS Diet: www.gaps.me

To work with me on implementing the GAPS Diet, schedule a free consultation here:  http://simplybeingwell.com/Consultations.html

Weston A. Price Foundation

Note: Some of the above are affiliate links. Thank you for supporting my writing.
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Great Children’s Book: The Adventures of Andrew Price!

 

Andrew-Price-Plane-2

Love traditional food? (You must, if you are reading my blog!) Ever wonder how to explain the importance of nutrient-dense food to children in a way that is fun and informative? Here’s the answer! The Adventures of Andrew Price is a wonderful children’s book that does just that. In this book, the fictitious great-great-nephew of Dr. Weston A. Price follows in his footsteps and discovers how traditional societies nourished themselves for optimal health. Sandrine Love, founder of Nourishing Our Children, collaborated with Mohammad Naser to publish the book. Simply Being Well is a proud sponsor of the book because I love the idea of helping to spread the importance of nourishing, traditional food to children.

Full Circle!

I was so thrilled to hear that The Adventures of Andrew Price went to Africa! Feels like the teaching has come full circle! The book (the great-great-nephew) followed in his great-great-uncle Weston A. Price’s footsteps, returning to the place where much of Weston Price’s research about traditional diets was done. How cool is that?! I think it is very cool. Read on to hear how Andrew Price got to Africa!

Hilda Labrada Gore, host of the Weston A. Price Foundation’s podcast series and a local chapter leader, has made two trips to Africa thus far on behalf of the Foundation. Her intention has been to inspire those she met to take an interest in their own traditional diets and to teach about what Dr. Price observed when he traveled to Africa himself.

IMG_8007 Hilda with students

While in Kenya, Hilda visited an orphanage and school called By Grace. Those she visited have cows and drink raw milk from the cows. Their diet is a mix of traditional and so-called modern foods. Hilda read The Adventures of Andrew Price with the intention to teach the students and teachers about the value of their traditional diet. Above is a photo of Hilda at the school with the book.

Promotion

This book is currently on promotion!! What a deal!!

For an investment of $25 by June 24, 2016,   you will not only receive this fabulous book,  The Adventures of Andrew Price , but also ALL of Nourishing Our Children’s downloadable education materials which includes our DVD as .mov files, as well as the e-book, audio book, PowerPoint, study guide, food pyramid chart and food pyramid photographs after the promotion. That is a bundle that normally goes for a $150.00 donation! These are fabulous educational materials. They are visually beautiful, easy to follow, and top-notch professionally done. I LOVE them, and can wholeheartedly recommend. them.

If you have children, grandchildren, nieces or nephews, friends with children, teach children, participate in moms or parents groups…I encourage you to purchase a copy! The Adventures of Andrew Price is a great tool for communicating, in a simple way, the basis of the Weston A. Price principles and the importance of eating nourishing, real foods!

 

The complimentary bundle of educational materials will be emailed to all who order the book on June 25, 2016.

Note that this  book is a limited edition and there are only a few boxes of books left!

Book Review

Sally Fallon Morell, president of the Weston A. Price Foundation, and author of several books, including Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats has purchased copies of The Adventures of Andrew Price for her grandchildren and written a Thumbs Up Book Review of the book!

Check out these Testimonials!

“The minute The Adventures of Andrew Price arrived, we opened it right away and began to read it. It’s my son’s new favorite book and has opened a lot of discussion of grassfed milk and how we want to protect ourselves against cavities. So happy about this book, I hope more are to come … maybe a story about kids who eat their liver and cod liver oil! I could use a book like that! My son is five. When his friend came over to play, he was excited to show him the gallon of grass-fed milk we had in the fridge!” – Erika

 

5 Stars

“What a wonderful book. I pre-ordered this book before it was written and was thrilled to pick up my copy at the Weston A Price Foundation’s annual conference in November.  I was not disappointed!   It’s a beautifully bound hard cover book that is colorful and engaging.  It is a great way to introduce the next generation to the timeless principles discovered by Dr. Price.   It is not easy taking on such a in-depth volume, such as Dr. Price’s Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, and succinctly summarizing the important points in a way that is relevant and understandable to children, yet the author, Sandrine Love, does just that.  She not only summarized the diets of traditional people that Dr. Price studied, but also the consequences of not eating a traditional diet.  I highly recommend this book for children of all ages.

Combine it with the Nourishing Traditions Cookbook for Children and you have the ultimate duo for beginners of all ages to not only understand, but to implement a traditional foods lifestyle.” – Barbara Geatches

5 Stars

“I read The Adventures of Andrew Price to my 4 year old boy, and was very impressed with the book – it’s beautifully illustrated, and the story is both entertaining and instructive. While reading about the dietary changes that occurred to various cultures as they became more modern, I asked my son what he thought happened to the people. He immediately said: “They got cavities!” I was so proud of him for making the connection, and grateful for such a beautiful book. It speaks to children a lot more than all the lectures we parents can give them!” – Joanna Leyla

5 Stars

“The story told by Andrew Price is appealing to both young and old.  My 3 year old is now very concerned with unnatural ‘holes in his teeth’, or cavities, and reading it gives me a great opportunity to teach him about the importance of eating real food.  We have read it many times over.  My husband also learned new information from the book!  It is a darling book with fantastic illustrations.” – Jenny Moreland

5 Stars

I was at the Wise Traditions conference in Anaheim and this book was selling like hotcakes! I understand why. It is a perfect way to educated children (and adults) about Weston A. Price’s travels and discoveries. And it’s inspiring! When you turn the last page, you are ready to go out and eat well to be well (and to tell others about nourishing foods, to boot)! – Hilda Labrada Gore

Order

Order your book and receive all of the Nourishing Our Children educational materials for free here!

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“Mom! Is that butter?!”

Was the call from my eight year old son this morning. I had just offered him a graham cracker that was covered with what we call “Nature’s frosting”: butter. Organic butter, that is…a good half inch high. Why did he question whether it was butter, you ask? Ah, the tale I will tell! Can anyone guess?

Organic butter: White :(

Organic butter: White 😦

The COLOR. The color of the butter was very light yellow to almost white. The color my son is used to seeing is YELLOW. Is this significant? YES. The color of the butter will let you know that the cows ate GRASS. We KNOW that what cows eat is highly significant: to the cows, the Earth, and our bodies.

What is very interesting to me (and should be to you also) is that the butter was ORGANIC. This is significant also… It tells you that even though butter may be organic, it in no way means it comes from grass-fed or pastured cows. (It does currently guarantee that the grains the cows are fed are organic– which will guard you from the GMO-laden feeds used in conventional dairies. ) Why should you care?

Folks all over the country are starting to wake up to preferring grass-fed or “pastured” dairy products including butter, milk, cream and cheese. Grass-fed or pastured dairy is nutritionally superior to dairy that comes from grain-fed operations. And not only that, but it also comes from cows that are raised on pasture, as Nature intended them to be… Not in the confinement feeding operations (CAFOs, confined animal feeding operations) that became so popular in this country in the eighties.

Beautiful YELLOW grass-fed butter!! Homemade!

Beautiful YELLOW grass-fed butter!! Homemade!

So in this case, “the eyes have it”: rich, yellow butter IS better. And use it liberally, folks. Nature’s frosting.

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I found the perfect bones…and my new favorite soup: oxtail!

Oh yes…it was a bit of an accident, but a happy one at that…I found the perfect bones for GAPSTM stock! I found the perfect bones for a nutrient-dense stock! I was in my local butcher shop, my local grass-fed only butcher shop and there they were…on the top shelf, calling to me. But first things first.

What is GAPSTM and what is the perfect stock for GAPSTM? I call GAPSTM a healing protocol. Short for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome, it aims to heal the gut lining and cure all sorts of dis-eases in the body including Autism, ADD, AD/HD, Aspberger’s, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, depression, allergies and auto-immune disorders. I have been making stock for a long time, and GAPSTM stock, or stock you make for yourself when you are on the GAPSTM diet is a special kind of stock to me. I will endeavor to explain.

When you make “bone broth”, or “nutrient-dense stock”, your goal is a volume of gelatinous stock (or a demi glace, but that is not usual.) Bones and vegetables are discarded after a long “rolling” or simmering…often 40-60 hours or more. When you are making GAPSTM stock, there are five things you are looking for: the stock, gelatin, tendons, meat and fat. You make the stock so that you may drink it or use it as the base of soups and stews. You may eat the gelatin in cubes if the stock is made well, just like jello! (Believe it or not, that red dye no. 5, high-fructose corn syrup laden cherry jello they serve to convalescing patients in hospitals has its origin in real gelatin from real stock! It is a truly healing food! How far we have digressed…) You are also to eat the tendons, the meat and the fat. It takes a special kind of bone to give you tendons, meat, and fat. And I have found it. The ox tail. (The bison tail works, too.)

Ox tails or bison tails make the best stock because they give everything you need: stock, gel, cartilage and tendons, meat, and fat. And oh, do they give FLAVOR.

So back to my story. A package of ox tail called to me from the top shelf of the refrigerator. I couldn’t believe how beautiful it was. Rich, red meat, beautiful white fat throughout, and lots of cartilage and tendons. I salivated as I saw it and I salivate as I write now.

I had never made oxtail soup or oxtail broth. I had never seen oxtail. I remember having oxtail soup when I was young, but when I asked mom about it the other day, it was a packaged soup mix. So I was on my own.

I consulted some cookbooks and then decided to strike out on my own…and it was tremendous. Stupendous. Unbelievably delicious. Deeply nourishing. The whole family delighted in it. My six year old said his “tummy was dancing” it was so happy. It was “the best soup I ever made”. Soooooooooo on to the recipe.

Oxtail is so heavy in fat, that you will have to cool it before you use it in a soup. So it’s a two step process, like any other good soup. Make the stock and then make the soup. But you’ll be saving and eating much of what you made the stock with.

Recipe I: Oxtail Stock

2 pounds of oxtail or bison tail, cut into 1 inch pieces

3 carrots, scrubbed and coarsely chopped

3 celery ribs, coarsely chopped

1 medium onion, coarsely chopped

You may choose to brown the oxtail before you make the stock. This will serve to intensify the flavor and color of your stock. Variation 1: Place the oxtails on a sheet pan and bake in a 350 F oven for 30-45 minutes, or Variation 2: melt some tallow, lard, or pastured butter in a skillet and brown both sides of the oxtail.

If you brown the oxtail, be sure to scrape all the juices and fat into the pan. Do not discard them.

So put the oxtail into a 6-8 quart Dutch oven and cover with water. Add the vegetables. Bring to a boil, skim and discard the scum. Lower heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for about 20 hours.

Strain and cool. Reserve all the meat and discard the vegetables. Chop the meat and fat and tendons and keep in a bowl or container while the stock cools. (Note: this step may take several hours or overnight in order to allow the fat to cool and harden.)

When the stock has cooled, take off the layer of fat and reserve for cooking (or adding back in to the oxtail soup when you make it.)

Recipe II: Oxtail Soup

2-3 quarts oxtail stock (or beef stock if you don’t have oxtail stock)

2-3 carrots, finely diced

2-3 celery ribs, finely diced

1-2 medium potato or turnip, finely diced

thyme, about 2 tsp dried or 2 T fresh

Celtic salt, to taste

freshly ground pepper

cayenne pepper, pinch

port or brandy, 2 T, (optional)

tomato paste, organic, about 3 T

reserved oxtail meat and fat

Place everything into a soup pot except the tomato paste, optional port and meat. Bring to a boil and skim and discard scum. Lower to a simmer and cover. Cook until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes.

Add tomato paste and stir until incorporated. Add optional port and meat and allow to heat through, about 4-5 minutes.

Serve with prepared horseradish, fresh ground pepper and sea salt. You may wish to add a tablespoon of fermented ketchup to your bowl just prior to that first bite! I did!

Hints: Grow Your Soup!

So you’ve enjoyed your first night of oxtail soup (or any other stock based soup) and there is a bit left, but not enough for another meal. Add more stock-oxtail or beef in this case- and a bit more tomato paste and thyme. It will not be as thick, but it will taste as good!

Another hint: if you need a hearty second meal, add some soaked wild or brown rice to the hint above. Now you’ve got a stew!

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This is a square of oxtail stock. I cut a square of gelled stock out of the bowl.

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My new favorite sandwich!

Yum yum yum.

I was craving liver again today. Don’t know if it was all the talk about my Liver Pate: Nutrient-Dense Nirvana class in Baltimore on February 3, or if it is just because my body needs those nutrients that liver provides. Luckily, I had frozen some of the chicken liver pate I made last. (Yes, frozen. We’ll talk more about freezing pate later.)

So I went off to the kitchen and sliced off a paper thin slice of traditional Baltic Rye, spread a hearty helping of chicken liver pate on it, topped it with a slab of grass-fed butter and sprinkled on some good Celtic salt. Mmm mmm. Ate a little homemade sauerkraut on the side. Think I found my new favorite snack. Nutrient-packed, easy to assemble and delicious. 🙂

20120118-174501.jpgSo about freezing pate– often a batch of pate yields several servings, and unless you have a family of 6 or 8, you won’t go through it in one sitting, or even a week.  Storage options: first, I love to top my pate with a half inch or more layer of melted butter. As it cools, the butter will seal air out and preserve the pate. Sealed in this way, pate will last weeks in your refrigerator. Another option is to make up your pate in the usual way, in ramekins or mason jars or BPA-free plastic containers that have been lined with parchment. Then freeze for as long as you need to (although I don’t recommend freezing anything longer than six months. I feel more comfortable at three.) I also like to freeze my pate in one person portions… That is, the amount one person will consume within a week.

Now, how about some bread options? Don’t have Baltic Rye (which is rye, yeast, caraway seeds, sugar, water and salt)? Sourdough is best- what I call a “true sourdough”-no gluten added; made in the traditional way. Next, a sprouted bread, but check the ingredients… More and more commercial bakeries are adding in “vital wheat gluten”!!! I also love to make little pate sandwiches on soaked buckwheat-oat pancakes. Pop ’em right in your mouth. So how about those of you who don’t eat bread or grains, even fermented or sprouted? I have spread my pate on coconut flour pancakes and coconut flour bread, almond flour pancakes and heck, even eaten it with a spoon right out of the jar! …Another taste treat: add some of your homemade, fermented mustard! Yes, culinary nirvana…a taste treat that’s good for you!!

Enjoy!

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Eggnog Made Right is a Super-Food!

Yes, it’s true! Eggnog a super-food! But this is not your ordinary, store-bought eggnog. It is not even the organic eggnog available on supermarket shelves. It is eggnog you make yourself, from pure, nutrient-dense ingredients in their most natural state: clean, pure, fresh milk, raw egg yolks from pastured hens, fresh grated nutmeg and perhaps a dash of cinnamon. Some folks like to add cream, but my experience with fresh raw milk is that it is do rich, the cream is not needed.

Let me tell you how I happened upon this: I was working at the annual Weston A. Price Foundation conference in Dallas last month, Wise Traditions 2011, coordinating all the food and acting as liaison between WAPF principles and the kitchen staff for 1200 or so participants. Long days, lots of running, to put it mildly. I needed my body to keep up the pave, and I needed my mind to stay clear. I was blessed to work with Mike Mudrak, (who was what I called a “runner”; others would call him a “gopher”, amd oh what a running gopher he was!) I got to meet Mike’s wife Judith. (Judith runs an annual tour to her native Switzerland every year through WAPF.) Every morning, they started their day with eggnog. This was a simple recipe: raw milk and raw egg yolks; often 5 yolks to about 8-12 oz. of milk. Stir. Down the hatch! I was a disbeliever-and then I tried a glass. (Truth be told, Judith took it easy on me and I started with a small glass and 3 yolks instead of their usual 5 or 6.) Wow! Nutrient-dense Nirvana! That cup of power got me through for hours! And my thinking was sharp and clear, even though I had been working for days!

So just last night, I was craving calcium and fat. I had just enjoyed a delightful meal of potatoes, onions and kale cooked in bacon fat with German sausages from our local meat market. Still hungry. Then I remembered: eggnog. I had all the ingredients right in my fridge. Yum yum. Down the hatch! Delish! That’s when it occurred to me; I started thinking… eggnog made well is a true super-food! All of the live enzymes, good fat, healthy bacteria, and available protein in the fresh milk plus all the nutrients in the incredible egg yolk! Some cinnamon for stoking the digestive fire…

If you are blessed in this country to have access to fresh, clean, raw milk and pastured eggs, make this super-food for your family! Especially your children! Don’t hold back! They need the calcium and the fat and the choline in the yolks for their brains! Enjoy! Enjoy! And happy holidays to all of you who celebrate the season!

P. S. I do not encourage you to try this with pasteurized milk or cream. Organic or not, from grass-fed cows or not, pasteurized milk is hard to digest for most people and is just not worth it. A possible compromise: use watered down organic, whole milk, plain yogurt with pastured egg yolks. Just “up” the number of yolks and add vanilla and a bit of maple syrup to counter the sour yogurt taste!

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My first book…buy yours NOW!

I am happy to announce my first book (I say that because I have many more on the agenda!)…

with Love from Grandmother’s Kitchen: Traditional Cooking Techniques for Well-Beingcover with Love from Grandmother's Kitchen

The book covers all the techniques you need to cook nourishing, traditional food!

***For more information about the book, including sample pages and info about content, click HERE***

Due out 11/11/11! (How auspicious!)

Order yours today!

If you would like to purchase more than 5 copies, or if you would like to order in bulk or wholesale, kindly contact me directly at simplybeingwell at gmail.com!

Special thanks to Amy Berger for her research and contribution and to Jessica Haney, editor, without whose tireless work this would not have been published! 

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